Ktetaichinh’s Blog

May 26, 2010

Foreign direct investment and economic growth in Vietnam Sajid Anwara* and Lan Phi Nguyenb

Filed under: Uncategorized — ktetaichinh @ 3:50 am
Tags:

http://www.viet-studies.info/kinhte/FDI_Growth_VN.pdf

Foreign direct investment and economic growth in Vietnam
Sajid Anwara* and Lan Phi Nguyenb
aUniversity of the Sunshine Coast, Australia and University of South Australia, Australia; bNational
Economics University, Vietnam
By making use of a recently released panel dataset that covers 61 provinces of Vietnam
from 1996–2005, this study examines the link between foreign direct investment and
economic growth. Our analysis, which is based on a simultaneous equations model,
reveals that in overall terms a mutually reinforcing two-way linkage between FDI and
economic growth exists in Vietnam. However, this is not the case for each and every
region of Vietnam. The results presented in this study suggest that the impact of foreign
direct investment on economic growth in Vietnam will be larger if more resources are
invested in education and training, financial market development and in reducing the
technology gap between the foreign and local firms.
Keywords: economic growth; foreign direct investment; globalization; Vietnam
Introduction
Foreign direct investment (FDI) has contributed to impressive economic growth in a
number of developing countries. Generally speaking, FDI not only increases the supply of
capital but, given the appropriate host-country policies, it can also facilitate technology
transfer. Technology transfer contributes to human capital formation which can further
enhance prospects of economic growth. In other words, FDI can facilitate economic
growth through direct as well as indirect channels.1
The introduction of the reform policy known as Doi Moi in 1986 marked the beginning
of Vietnam’s impressive economic growth. The reform process has resulted in a general
increase in the standard of living in Vietnam as measured by real GDP per capita. Vietnam
started attracting significant FDI from 1988, which can be attributed to promulgation of a
liberal foreign investment law in 1987. FDI inflow into Vietnam increased from US$0.32
billion in 1988 to approximately US$4.0 billion in 2005, with an annual growth rate of
28% (GSO 2007).2 In the early stages, the contribution of FDI to employment growth was
small but there was a large increase in industrial output. In recent years, FDI inflows have
played an important role, not only in providing investment capital but also in stimulating
export growth. Figure 1 shows an interesting transition in Vietnamese economy; from
2001 onwards, the contribution of the manufacturing sector to GDP is consistently larger
than that of the agricultural sector.
It is interesting to note that the presence of foreign firms also resulted in a significant
increase in Vietnam government’s tax revenue (Freeman 2002). Up until the late 1990s,
most FDI was in the form of joint ventures where the local partner generally provided 30%
of the total value of the investment (Binh and Haughton 2002). The entry of foreign firms
ISSN 1360-2381 print/ISSN 1743-792X online
q 2010 Taylor & Francis
DOI: 10.1080/10438590802511031
http://www.informaworld.com
*Corresponding author. Email: Sajid.Anwar@unisa.edu.au and lannp@neu.edu.vn
Asia Pacific Business Review
Vol. 16, Nos. 1–2, January–April 2010, 183–202
resulted in greater diversity and increased competition in Vietnam. FDI not only injected
badly needed capital but also expanded the size of the private sector. In overall terms, the
expansion of FDI in Vietnam can be viewed as the expansion of private sector in the
country which greatly helped the economic reform process. The amount of actual
investment reached its peak in 1995–1996. As highlighted by Freeman and Nestor (2004),
due to the involvement of more than one government agencies and related factors, the
actual investment in Vietnam has been well below the registered FDI. In addition, most
FDI has been concentrated in a few regions of Vietnam. Changes to the foreign investment
law in 1996 were aimed at achieving a relatively more even distribution of FDI across all
regions of Vietnam. However, there has been only limited success. While the output of
foreign firms in Vietnam has registered a steep rise from 1996 to 2005 and beyond, most
foreign firms are still concentrated in Red River Delta and South East regions.
The flow of FDI to Vietnam was significantly affected by the Asian financial crisis of
1997–1998. Despite improvements to FDI related laws and a general improvement in
foreign investor confidence, FDI activity in Vietnam remained subdued till 2001. Freeman
(2001), among others, has argued that this reflects the failure of at least some aspects of
government policy towards FDI. Changes to the foreign investment law, new enterprise
law and signing of a free trade agreement with the US in 2001 led to substantial
improvement in foreign investor sentiments toward Vietnam but there was not much
increase in the FDI inflow. Other policies introduced by the Vietnamese government
include the opening of a stock market and the resumption of IMF lending. These policies
contributed to a slow increase in FDI during 2001–2003. Since then there has been a rapid
rise in FDI in Vietnam. During the first seven months of 2008, FDI has already reached the
amount of US$45.2 billion (GSO 2008). This can also be attributed to Vietnam’s accession
to WTO in 2006. The accession to WTO is a clear recognition of Vietnam’s economic
reform policies and engagement with global economy. The process of accession to WTO
started in early 1995 and ended in late 2006.
Literature review
Endogenous growth literature (for example see Romer 1986, Lucas 1988, 1993) highlights
the role of human capital in attracting foreign investment in developing countries. This
literature suggests that foreign investment enhances economic growth through technology
diffusion.3 Multinational corporations (MNCs) that are a vehicle of FDI can have a
positive impact on human capital in host countries, for example through training courses
Figure 1. GDP by type of economic activity at 1994 constant prices (billion VND).
Source: GSO (2008).
184 S. Anwar and L.P. Nguyen
offered to their subsidiaries’ local workers. The training courses can be beneficial to all
employees ranging from less skilled to highly skilled workers. Research and development
activities undertaken by MNCs also contribute to human capital growth in host countries
and thus enable their economies to grow in the long run (Balasubramanyam and Salisu
1991, Blomstro¨m and Kokko 2001).
On the other hand, the eclectic theory of FDI, developed by Dunning (1988), provides
an alternative tool to analyse the relationship between FDI and economic growth. Based
on location advantages, many empirical studies have found that economic growth is an
important determinant of FDI. Chakrabarti (2001), for example, argues that higher
economic growth results in higher FDI inflow. Recent empirical studies have used
endogenous growth models to investigate the impact of FDI on economic growth in host
developing countries. Borensztein et al. (1998) examine the impact of FDI on economic
growth in 69 developing countries for the periods 1970–1979 and 1980–1989. They have
utilized a model where economic growth is determined by FDI, human capital,
government expenditure, domestic investment, inflation rate and institutions. In order to
overcome the endogeneity problem, the model is estimated by two stage least squares
(2SLS). They found that: (i) FDI inflows positively influence economic growth, and (ii)
FDI and domestic investment were complementary.
By making use of panel data for the period 1970–1990 involving OECD and non-
OECD countries, De Mello (1997) examined the impact of FDI on capital accumulation,
output and total factor productivity growth. De Mello suggests that FDI provides a boost
for economic growth in the long run through technological progress and knowledge
spillovers. However, de Mello emphasises that FDI-led growth depends on the degree of
complementarity and substitution between FDI and domestic investment. By using panel
data for 18 countries in Latin America during the period 1970–1999, Bengoa and
Sanchez-Robles (2003) found that the impact of FDI on economic growth is positive only
when host countries had adequate human capital, economic stability and liberalized
markets. Alfaro et al. (2004), using cross-country data for the period 1975–1995, found
that FDI plays an important role in contributing to economic growth. However, countries
with well-developed financial markets tend to gain more from FDI. This means that
countries with relatively well-developed financial systems can better exploit FDI. As a
result, FDI can make a larger contribution to economic growth. This finding is supported
by Hermes and Lensink (2003) and Aghion et al. (2006). Moreover, these studies also
emphasise that less developed countries should reform their domestic financial system
before liberalizing the capital account to allow for enlarged FDI inflows.
Tsai (1994) employed a simultaneous system of equations to test two-way linkages
between FDI and economic growth for 62 countries for the period 1975–1978 and for 51
countries for the period 1983–1986. His work supports the view that two-way linkages
exist between FDI and growth. Berthelemy and De´murger (2000) used a simultaneous
equation model involving 24 Chinese provinces for the period 1985–1996. They found
that FDI inflows play an important role in promoting provincial economic growth. Bende-
Nabende et al. (2001) investigated whether FDI caused economic growth in the ASEAN-5
economies during the period 1970–1996 and if that was so, whether economic growth had
a significant affect in attracting FDI to the region. Their analysis shows that FDI promotes
economic growth most effectively through human capital and learning by doing effects
and, in turn, economic growth influences FDI.
Using panel data involving 84 countries over the period 1970–1999, Li and Liu (2005)
utilized both single and simultaneous equation models to examine the relationship
between FDI and economic growth. They found that only from the mid-1980s, FDI and
Asia Pacific Business Review 185
economic growth became significantly complementary to each other. Moreover, they
show that FDI not only directly promotes economic growth but also, indirectly, through its
interaction with other variables. There is a strong positive interaction effect, for example,
involving FDI and human capital and a strong negative interaction effect involving FDI
and technology gap. Wang and Gu (2006) have investigated the impact of absorptive
capacity in the context of FDI in Canadian manufacturing industries. Wang and Gu found
that FDI promotes economic growth only when host countries have an adequate level of
human capital. Driffield and Love (2007), among others, have shown that through
spillover effects, FDI can also boost productivity.
Although these studies provide ample evidence of a link between FDI and economic
growth in both developed and developing countries, few studies have considered the role of
FDI in promoting economic growth within different regions of developing countries. Mai
(2003) has considered the impact of FDI on economic growth in Vietnam for the period
1988–1998. He concludes that FDI flows have resulted in enhancing domestic saving and
investment. While providing a review of earlier studies on the role of FDI in Vietnam,
Nguyen and Nguyen (2007) have conceded that the literature on Vietnam is still in its
infancy. Moreover, the two-way linkage between FDI and economic growth in which FDI
promotes economic growth and, in turn, economic growth is viewed as a tool to attract FDI is
not thoroughly investigated. This study attempts to fill this gap in the existing literature.
By making use of panel data on 61 Vietnamese provinces for the period 1996–2005,
this study attempts to empirically examine the two-way linkage between FDI and
provincial economic growth in Vietnam. Most available empirical studies that deal with
the effect of FDI in Vietnam have been severely limited due to the lack of appropriate
data.4 This study makes use of the most detailed annual dataset that has been recently
released by the Vietnam government. Figure 2 shows the output of foreign and domestic
firms for the period 1996–2005. It is clear that both foreign and domestic firms have
experienced strong growth during the sample period.
Hypotheses
The hypotheses tested in this study are as follows:
H1: A mutually reinforcing two-way linkage between FDI and economic growth exists in
Vietnam.
Figure 2. Output of foreign and domestic firms in Vietnam – 1994 constant prices (VND billion).
Source: GSO (2008).
186 S. Anwar and L.P. Nguyen
H2: A mutually reinforcing two-way linkage between FDI and economic growth exists in
all seven regions of Vietnam.
H3: Regions with better infrastructure, more skilled labour and larger market size are
relatively more attractive to foreign investors.
H4: FDI significantly affects Vietnam’s economic growth through its absorptive
capacity.
H5: Education and training enhances the impact of FDI on economic growth in Vietnam.
H6: A smaller technology gap between the foreign and local firms enhances the impact of
FDI on economic growth in Vietnam.
Empirical model and data sources
In order to test the above hypotheses, this study makes use of panel data. Analysis of panel
data yields more reliable statistical results because such data takes into account variation
over time, as well as variation across all subjects (which in the present case are the 61
provinces of Vietnam). A good introduction to panel data techniques can be found in
Greene (2008).
Based on the existing literature, it can be argued that economic growth and FDI depend
on a number of factors. Some of the main determinants are discussed below. The
discussion is used to develop an empirical model.
Determinants of economic growth
Human capital
Human capital is long regarded as a determinant of economic growth (see Barro and Salai-
Martin 2004 and references therein). Human capital also affects growth through its
interaction with FDI. A number of proxies have been used to measure human capital. This
study uses the number of university and college enrolment per thousand persons as a proxy
for human capital in Vietnam.
Learning by doing
Another well-known determinant of economic growth is learning by doing. Grossman and
Helpman (1991) among others have emphasised that learning by doing can have a positive
effect on growth during economic transition, as well as in the long term. Bende-Nabende
et al. (2001) found that technological learning by doing has stimulated economic growth in
the ASEAN-5 economies from 1970–1996. They used annual manufacturing value added
as a percentage of GDP as a proxy for learning by doing. This study uses the same proxy to
measure the extent of learning by doing in Vietnam.
Exports
The endogenous growth theory pioneered by Romer (1986) and Lucas (1988) has provided
persuasive evidence for the proposition that an increase in exports as a percentage of GDP
has a positive effect on economic growth. Grossman and Helpman (1991) and Barro and
Sala-i-Martin (2004) have argued that a more open trade regime leads to a greater ability to
absorb technological progress and export goods that stimulates economic growth.
Grossman and Helpman (1991) and Rodrik (1992) have pointed out that exports can
potentially create growth-accelerating forces.
Asia Pacific Business Review 187
Macroeconomic stability
While early studies, such as Friedman (1977) have highlighted the role of the inflation rate,
recent studies have used the real exchange rate as an indicator of macroeconomic stability.
The real exchange rate volatility is regarded as an indicator for poor macroeconomic
policies that lead to real exchange rate misalignment thereby hindering economic growth
(Kamin and Rogers 2000, Husain et al. 2005). This study uses the real exchange rate as an
indicator of macroeconomic stability in Vietnam.
Level of financial development
Barro (1991) has argued that financial development has a significant positive impact on
economic growth. King and Levine (1993) have suggested that higher levels of domestic
investment are positively related to faster economic growth. Hermes and Lensink (2003)
have argued that that the development of the financial system of a host country is an
important precondition for FDI to have a positive effect on economic growth. They further
argue that a well-developed financial system positively contributes to the process of
technological diffusion associated with FDI. Since the data on the usual measures of
financial development is not available for Vietnam, this study uses domestic investment,
as a percentage of GDP, as a proxy for financial development in Vietnam.
Public investment
In the case of developing countries, the effect of public investment on economic growth
can be negative. Durham (2004) argues that when public investment is financed by
increasing taxes, it could further raise distortions in developing countries and increase
input costs and hence, its effect on output growth can be negative. Public investment is
likely to have a positive effect on output growth if it is directed towards activities such as
infrastructure improvement and human capital accumulation. Blankenau and Simpson
(2004) have argued that governments play an essential role in human capital accumulation
by providing funds for formal schooling. Public education expenditures directly affect
human capital accumulation and consequently influence long-term growth. Accordingly,
an increase in public investment spending is expected to have a positive effect on
economic growth. This study uses the annual government investment expenditure as a
percentage of GDP as a measure of public investment in Vietnam.
Other determinants
Recent studies by Sachs (2003) and Presbitero (2006) have argued that geography plays a
direct and essential role in promoting economic growth through many channels including
human health, agricultural productivity, physical location, and proximity and ownership of
natural resources. Presbitero further argues that geographical conditions, especially
climate and natural endowment, could directly influence the level of current income
through the availability of natural resources as well as enabling access to international
trade and commercial routes. On the other hand, geography also influences the disease
ecology such as malaria and other tropical diseases, which hamper social and economic
growth in different ways. The other well-known determinants of economic growth are
labour force growth rate and FDI, both of which have been included as determinants of
economic growth in Vietnam. While the above is not an exhaustive list, we believe that we
have covered all major determinants of economic growth.
188 S. Anwar and L.P. Nguyen
Determinants of FDI
Market size
Market size which is one of the most important determinants of FDI is usually measured
by GDP per capita. Several empirical studies have shown that an increase in GDP per
capita is associated with increased FDI inflows into host countries. Rising income levels
are a signal of an increase in the market size and purchasing power. Kravis and Lipsey
(1982) found a positive relationship between the market size in host nations and the
location decision of US multinationals. Chakrabarti (2001) found a strong positive
relationship between the market size of a host country and FDI. Following the existing
literature, this study uses GDP per capita as a measure of Vietnamese market size.
Infrastructure development
Availability of international standard infrastructure is a major determinant of FDI in host
countries. A number of empirical studies have used different proxies to measure the level
of infrastructure development in host economies. For example, expenditure on road
transport was used as a proxy by Hill and Munday (1992). Per capita usage of energy by
Mudambi (1995), telephones per thousand of population by Asiedu (2002), railway
transport by Bengoa and Sanchez-Robles (2003) and a general transportation/urbanization
index by Glickman and Woodward (1988). This study utilizes telephones per thousand of
population as a measure of infrastructure development in Vietnam. This choice is dictated by
data availability constraints.
Labour market conditions
Availability of cheap labour is a major determinant of FDI in developing countries. Moore
(1993) and Lucas (1993) have suggested that FDI inflows tend to dry up as the cost of labour
increases. The empirical studies by Biswas (2002) and Brainard (1997) found a negative
relationship between the cost of labour and FDI inflows. This study uses the monthly
average wage of employees as a measure of the labour cost in Vietnam. The other aspect of
the labour market is the availability of skilled labour which is widely accepted as a
determinant of FDI. This study uses the percentage of skilled labour in the total labour force
as an additional labour market factor.
The level of openness
A decrease in the level of openness (that is, more trade restrictions) tends to increase
horizontal FDI in host countries. However, vertical FDI that is viewed as a non-market
seeking investment may prefer to locate in more open economies (that is, where trade
barriers are few). Balasubramanyam and Salisu (1991), Jackson and Markowski (1995) and
Chakrabarti (2001) have used export volume as a measure of the openness of an economy.
They have found a positive relationship between exports and FDI inflow. Buckley et al.
(2007) has used a similar measure. This study uses exports per capita as a measure of
openness of the Vietnamese economy.
Other determinants
The other well-known determinants of FDI in host developing countries include the GDP
growth rate, macroeconomic stability and domestic investment per capita. These three
variables are also regarded as the determinants of FDI in Vietnam. A recent study by
Asia Pacific Business Review 189
Buckley et al. (2007) highlights the importance of many of the above determinants of FDI.
Once again it is perhaps worth mentioning that the above is not an exhaustive list of the
determinants of FDI.
For the purposes of the present study, we make use of a recently released panel dataset
which provides annual data on 61 provinces of Vietnam for the period 1996–2005.
Unfortunately, comparable provincial data on relevant variables is not available
for previous years. The choice of the determinants of FDI and economic growth used in
the empirical model specified below is dictated by the availability of data. Most
of the data are collected from the General Statistics Office (GSO), the Ministry of
Planning and Investment (MPI), the Ministry of Labour Invalids and Social Affairs
(MOLISA) and the Ministry of Industry (MOI). See Table 1 for variable definition and
data sources.
Based on the existing literature and given the data availability constraints, the two-way
linkage between GDP growth and FDI in Vietnam is empirically examined by making use
of the following system of equations, where FDIit is FDI in province i in period t and so on,
and ai and bi are the unknown population coefficients.
Git ¼ a0 þa1FDIit þa2SIit þa3XGit þa4HCit þa5DIGit þa6LAit þa7LDit
þa8RERit þ 1it ð1Þ
FDIit ¼ b0 þb1Git þb2Yit þb3DIit þb4Xit þb5SKILLit þb6WAit þb7TELit
þb8RERit þmit ð2Þ
Table 1. Variable definitions and data sources.
Abbreviations Variable definition Source
G Provincial economic growth rate (annual %) GSO
Y GDP per capita (in thousands of VND at constant prices) GSO
FDI Stock of FDI per capita (in thousands of VND at constant prices) MPI
SI The ratio of annual government expenditure to GDP GSO
X Export of goods and services per capita (thousands of VND at constant
prices)
GSO
XG Ratio of exports to GDP GSO
HC Number of university and college students per thousand persons GSO
DIG The ratio of gross domestic investment to GDP GSO
DI Gross domestic investment per capita (thousands of VND at constant
prices)
GSO
TEL Telephones per thousand persons GSO
LD Learning by doing (annual manufacturing value added as a percentage
of GDP is used as a proxy)
MOI
RER Real exchange rate GSO
SKILL Percentage of skilled labour in total labour force MOLISA
WA Monthly average wage of employee (in thousands of VND at constant
prices)
MOLISA
LA The growth rate of labour (annual %) MOLISA
DUMMY Dummy ¼ 1 if cities and provinces located in the key economic regions;
zero otherwise
1it, mit Error terms
190 S. Anwar and L.P. Nguyen
Based on the existing literature, the expected signs of the estimated coefficients are
described in Table 2.
The above simultaneous equations were estimated by making use of two-stage least
squares (2SLS), three stage least squares (3SLS) and the generalized method of moments
(GMM). In the following, we only report the results of GMMestimation (with and without
a regional dummy variable). While the parameter estimates remained similar in magnitude
and sign, the GMM estimation results were generally found to be statistically more
robust.5
Data analysis
While estimating the two-way linkage between FDI and economic growth, SI, XG, HC,
DIG, LA, LD, RER, Y, DI, X, WA, SKILL, TEL and RER were used as instrumental
variables. The Durbin-Wu-Hausman test was used to test for endogeneity. The null
hypothesis was rejected, suggesting that ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates might be
biased and inconsistent and hence OLS was not an appropriate estimation technique.
In addition, the Pagan-Hall test was used to test for the presence of significant
heteroskedasticity. The null hypothesis of homoscedasticity was rejected, suggesting that
the GMM technique is consistent and efficient (see Greene 2008).
Based on the diagnostic tests (see Tables 3, 4, 5 and 6), the GMM results were found to
be reliable in relative terms. The estimated coefficients are given in Tables 3 and 4.
Table 3 suggests that FDI is an important determinant of the provincial economic
growth in Vietnam. The estimated coefficient of FDI in Table 3 is significant at 1% level.
In other words, one can argue with 99% confidence that increase in FDI in Vietnam
increases economic growth. Specifically, it is possible to argue that, other things remaining
constant, a one thousand Vietnamese dong (VND) increase in FDI in Vietnam would
contribute to an approximate 0.000054% increase in economic growth.
Other important determinants of economic growth in Vietnam are exports, government
expenditure, the level of financial market development, the growth of labour force, learning
Table 2. The expected signs of the estimated coefficients.
Dependent variables
Provincial economic growth rate (G) FDI
G n.a þ
FDI þ n.a
SI þ/2 n.a
XG þ n.a
HC þ n.a
DIG þ n.a
LA þ n.a
LD þ n.a
RER 2 þ
Y n.a þ
DI n.a þ
X n.a þ
SKILL n.a þ
WA n.a 2
TEL n.a þ
Asia Pacific Business Review 191
by doing, human capital and the real exchange rate. The ratio of exports to GDP is significant
at 1% level. The growth of the labour force is significant at 1% level. The estimated
coefficient of government expenditure in Equation (1) is not statistically significant. The
estimated coefficient of learning by doing is statistically significant at a 1% level and its sign
is consistentwith expectations. The significance of learning by doing perhaps reflects the fact
that some production activities involve assembling only. In addition, the Vietnamese labour
force is benefiting from knowledge spillovers thereby improving its productivity and hence,
stimulating economic growth. The estimated coefficient of the real exchange rate has an
expected negative sign and it is significant at the 1% level. The impact of human capital and
Table 4. Estimated results for Equation (2).
Dependent variable: FDI
GMM estimation without
regional dummy variable
GMM estimation with
regional dummy variable
Economic growth (G) 992.8359 (2.73)* 802.3072 (2.34)**
Market size (Y) 1.451904 (11.32)* 1.460676 (12.53)*
Domestic investment (DI) 0.050031 (5.71)* 0.052338 (6.64)*
Exports (X) 0.934665 (7.00)* 0.934665 (7.47)*
Labour skills (SKILL) 141.1244 (2.70)* 120.3292 (2.44)**
Labour cost (WA) 25.460528 (24.64)* 24.867383 (24.41)*
Infrastructure (TEL) 49.79898 (6.62)* 47.9732 (4.90)*
Real exchange rate (RER) 161.6789 (3.05)* 145.9019 (3.05)*
Regional dummy (DUMMY) 1179.619 (3.05)*
Constant 234,870.23 (23.86)* 231,513.77 (23.83)*
Hansen test ( p-value) 0.13 0.12
Durbin-Wu-Hausman test ( p-value) 0.00 0.00
Pagan-Hall test ( p-value) 0.01 0.01
Observations 543 543
Note: Robust standard errors in parentheses. ***Significant at 10%; **significant at 5%; *significant at 1%.
Table 3. Estimated results for Equation (1).
Dependent variable: provincial economic growth
Independent
variables
GMM estimation without
regional dummy variable
GMM estimation with
regional dummy variable
FDI 0.000054 (4.80)* 0.000049 (3.99)*
Exports (XG) 0.243119 (1.95)** 0.245129 (1.92)**
Government expenditure (SI) 0.068351 (0.29) 0.417532 (0.41)
Financial development (DIG) 1.256011 (2.93)* 1.184253 (2.71)*
Labour growth (LA) 0.157515 (2.58)* 0.408601 (2.88)*
Learning by doing (LD) 0.018336 (3.05)* 0.017551 (3.08)*
Human capital (HC) 0.038917 (2.64)* 0.037175 (2.58)*
Real exchange rate (RER) 20.094108 (24.27)* 20.136351 (24.82)*
Regional dummy (DUMMY) 0.391238 (1.13)
Constant 18.706020 (6.34)* 19.005950 (6.46)*
Hansen test ( p-value) 0.15 0.29
Durbin-Wu-Hausman test ( p-value) 0.00 0.05
Pagan-Hall test ( p-value) 0.01 0.02
Observations 563 563
Note: Robust standard errors in parentheses. ***Significant at 10%; **significant at 5%; *significant at 1%.
192 S. Anwar and L.P. Nguyen
Table 5. Impact of FDI on economic growth via absorptive capacity.
Dependent variable: provincial economic growth
Independent
variables
GMM estimation with
interaction between FDI
and human capital
GMM estimation with
interaction between FDI
and financial development
FDI 20.000089 (21.83) 0.000084 (4.53)*
Exports (XG) 0.264740 (2.16)** 0.334157 (2.22)**
Government expenditure (SI) 20.390307 (20.69) 20.569683 (20.57)
Financial development (DIG) 1.419888 (3.30)* 1.747579 (3.89)*
Labour growth (LA) 0.165762 (2.69)* 0.167893 (2.73)*
Learning by doing (LD) 0.020171 (3.42)* 0.018908 (3.01)*
Human capital (HC) 0.028890 (1.90)** 0.036969 (2.50)*
Real exchange rate (RER) 20.096025 (24.39)* 20.094292 (24.30)*
FDI* Human capital 0.000004 (2.25)**
FDI* Financial development 20.000059 (22.22)**
Constant 19.19335 (6.54)* 18.59838 (6.34)*
Hansen test ( p-value) 0.21 0.34
Durbin-Wu-Hausman test ( pvalue)
0.01 0.00
Pagan-Hall test ( p-value) 0.00 0.01
Observations 563 563
Note: Robust standard errors in parentheses. ***Significant at 10%; **significant at 5%; *significant at 1%.
Table 6. Economic growth and FDI (impact of education and training and technology gap).
Dependent variable: provincial economic growth in Vietnam
Independent
variables
GMM estimation with
education and training
and technology gap
GMM estimation
with interaction
between
FDI and education
and training
GMM estimation
with interaction
between FDI and
technology gap
FDI 0.000028 (2.81)* 0.000053 (3.19)* 20.000006 (20.05)
Exports (XG) 0.139887 (1.28) 0.148923 (1.25) 0.133530 (1.23)
Government expenditure
(SI)
21.592068 (21.99)** 21.628443 (22.04)**21.574779 (22.00)**
Financial development
(DIG)
0.957675 (2.42)* 1.033599 (2.66)* 0.999145 (2.62)*
Labour growth (LA) 0.124454 (2.31)** 0.120881 (2.25)** 0.127988 (2.43)*
Learning by doing (LD) 0.018639 (3.73)* 0.018457 (3.27)* 0.021126 (4.47)*
Education and training 0.153391 (1.64)*** 0.167511 (1.83)*** 0.169995 (1.86)***
Technology gap 22.178576 (23.83)* 22.210997 (24.00)* 21.442873 (22.70)*
Real exchange rate (RER) 20.064482 (23.65)* 20.063214 (23.25)* 20.056075 (23.23)*
FDI*Education and training
20.000025 (22.01)**
FDI*Technology gap 20.000225 (24.07)*
Constant 17.05742 (7.33)* 16.87612 (7.21)* 15.74285 (6.88)*
Hansen test ( p-value) 0.19 0.19 0.25
Durbin-Wu-Hausman test
( p-value)
0.00 0.01 0.00
Pagan-Hall test ( p-value) 0.04 0.00 0.00
Observations 563 563 563
Note: Robust standard errors in parentheses. ***Significant at 10%; **significant at 5%; *significant at 1%.
Asia Pacific Business Review 193
financial market development on economic growth is statistically significant at the 5% level
and the signs are positive.
Table 4 shows that economic growth has a significant positive effect on FDI in
Vietnam. The estimated coefficient is significant at 5% level. The estimated coefficient
indicates that, other things remaining constant, a 1% increase in economic growth would
lead to an increase in the stock of FDI per capita by approximately VND993,000. This
suggests that higher economic growth in Vietnam does send positive signals to prospective
foreign investors. It also shows an increasingly larger market size for investment in
Vietnam. GDP per capita, which is used as a measure of market size, has a positive and
significant effect on FDI (GMM estimation yields an estimated coefficient which is
significant at a 1% level, see column 1, Table 3). The estimated coefficient of domestic
investment is positive and statistically significant at 1% level, implying that FDI and
domestic investment in Vietnam are complements. In other words, increase in domestic
investment increases FDI in Vietnam and vice versa. The coefficient of exports is
consistent with expectations and statistically significant at the 1% level. The skill level of
the labour force is an important determinant of FDI in Vietnam. An increase in the
proportion of the skilled labour force leads to a significant increase in FDI in Vietnam.
The negative coefficient of the labour cost is significant at 1% level. This suggests that an
increase in the cost of labour in Vietnam can reduce FDI. The impact of infrastructure
development on FDI is positive and statistically significant at 1% level. Finally,
depreciation of the real exchange rate in Vietnam tends to raise FDI and this effect is
statistically significant at 1% level.
The geographical distribution of FDI in Vietnam is characterized by its concentration
in the key economic cities and provinces in the South such as Ho Chi Minh City, Dong
Nai, Binh Duong and Baria Vung Tau, and in the North such as Hanoi, Hai Duong, Vinh
Phuc, Hai Phong and Quang Ninh. Thus, we extended our model by introducing a dummy
variable for provinces in the key regions including Red River Delta and South East, which
have the highest inflows of FDI. It is expected that cities and provinces in the key
economic regions with better infrastructure, skilled workers, and higher income tend to
attract more FDI and grow faster. Column 3 of Table 3 and Table 4 show the estimated
results when Equations (1) and (2) are re-estimated by GMM after inclusion of a regional
dummy variable. The regional dummy variable has a positive sign in both the economic
growth and FDI equations. In economic growth equation, it is not significant. In FDI
equation, the regional dummy variable is significant at 1% level. The introduction of the
dummy variable leads to a minor change in the magnitude of the estimated coefficients
without affecting their significance level. The estimated results suggest that cities and
provinces in the key economic regions such as Red River Delta and South East with better
infrastructure, more skilled labour and larger market size tend to attract more FDI.
Recent empirical studies have argued that the impact of FDI on economic growth also
depends on the existence of adequate absorptive capacity in host economies. Absorptive
capacity of an economy can be measured by factors such as the stock of human capital, the
level of financial market development and the extent of technology gap between the
foreign and local firms. It has been argued that FDI has a direct and indirect effect on
economic growth. The direct effect arises from a FDI-led increase in the supply of capital
which increases the overall production capacity of the host economy. The indirect effect
on economic growth arises from FDI’s interaction with factors such as the level of
financial development, the stock of human capital and the extent of technology gap.
In order to examine the effect of FDI on economic growth through Vietnam’s absorptive
capacity, Equation (1) is re-estimated after introducing: (i) the interaction of FDI and
194 S. Anwar and L.P. Nguyen
human capital, and (ii) the interaction of FDI and the level of financial market
development, as additional independent variables.
Table 5 shows the estimated results when absorptive capacity has been explicitly taken
into account. As can be seen in Table 5, the estimated coefficient of the interaction
between FDI and human capital is positive and statistically significant at 5% level. This
implies that as far as the stock of human capital is concerned, Vietnam has reached the
minimum required threshold. Table 5 shows that the estimated coefficient of the
interaction between FDI and the level of financial market development is negative and
statistically significant at 5% level. This suggests that as far as the level of financial market
development is concerned, Vietnam has not reached the required minimum threshold. In
other words, by further developing its financial markets, Vietnam can take additional
advantage of FDI inflows.
The endogenous growth theory suggests that expenditure on education and training
and the extent of technology gap affects the capacity of host countries to absorb
externalities from FDI (Lucas 1988, 1993). Thus, we further investigate the effect of real
spending on education and training and the extent of technology gap on provincial
economic growth in Vietnam, as well as their effect on economic growth via the absorptive
capacity. Since human capital and spending on education and training are highly
correlated, we replace human capital variable with real spending on education and
training in Equation (1) and introduce the technology gap as an additional independent
variable (the estimated results are shown in column 2, Table 6). The impact of the
interaction between the new measure of human capital and FDI on economic growth (the
estimated results are shown in column 3, Table 6) is also investigated. Column 4 of Table 6
shows the estimated results when the interaction between FDI and technology gap has
been explicitly taken into account. The technology gap is measured as the percentage
difference between the average growth of foreign and domestic firms in Vietnam.
The estimated coefficient of the education and training variable was expected to be
positive, while the estimated coefficient of the technology gap variable is expected
to be negative.
Column (2) of Table 6 indicates that the estimated coefficient of education and training is
positive and statistically significant at a 10% level. This means investment in education and
training contribute positively to provincial economic growth in Vietnam. The estimated
coefficient of the technology gap is negative and significant at the1%level. This confirms that
Vietnamese provinces with lower technology gap experience a higher rate of economic
growth. We also investigate the effects of FDI on economic growth via absorptive capacity
(see column 3 and 4 in Table 6). The estimated coefficient of the interaction between FDI and
education and training is found to be negative and statistically significant at 5% level. This
suggests that as far as education and training is concerned, Vietnam has not reached the
required minimum threshold. In other words, a certain level of investment in education and
training is an important prerequisite for FDI to have a positive effect on economic growth in
Vietnam. The coefficient of the interaction between FDI and technology gap is negative and
statistically significant at 1%level. This suggests that technology gap between the foreign and
local firms in Vietnam remains very large. In other words, an increase in FDI will lead to a
larger positive effect on economic growth as the technology gap narrows.
Finally in order to focus on the link between FDI and regional economic growth in
Vietnam, the dataset was dived into seven regions namely Red River Delta, North East,
North Central Coast, South Central Coast, Central Highland, South East and Mekong
River Delta. Equations (1) and (2) were estimated for each region. The estimated results
are reported in Tables 7 and 8.
Asia Pacific Business Review 195
Table 7. FDI and economic growth across regions of Vietnam – estimation of Equation (1).
Dependent variable: provincial economic growth
Red River Delta North East North Central Coast South Central Coast Central Highlands South East Mekong River Delta
Independent
variables (1) (2) (1) (2) (1) (2) (1) (2) (1) (2) (1) (2) (1) (2)
FDI 0.00014
(1.77)***
0.00012
(1.73)***
0.00023
(2.53)*
0.00017
(2.47)**
0.00014
(0.31)
0.00022
(0.44)
20.00010
(20.91)
20.00004
(20.64)
0.00005
(0.34)
0.00001
(0.09)
0.00005
(2.53)**
0.00004
(1.75)***
0.00021
(2.42)**
0.00011
(1.79)***
Exports 6.42506
(1.90)***
5.20811
(1.92)***
0.08556
(0.74)
0.04785
(0.47)
1.26410
(0.25)
21.46854
(20.40)
0.90797
(0.88)
1.29376
(1.57)
12.85454
(2.19)**
12.07474
(2.43)**
20.33064
(20.78)
0.38598
(1.04)
20.88852
(20.67)
21.03949
(21.04)
Government
expenditure
21.10107
(20.24)
24.69388
(20.85)
0.28395
(0.13)
21.30221
(20.82)
2.01699
(0.84)
2.01335
(1.08)
22.36012
(20.48)
20.19845
(20.07)
5.05208
(0.87)
23.61032
(20.56)
0.77686
(0.22)
4.44505
(1.36)
8.83748
(1.02)
20.42617
(20.08)
Financial
development
20.14261
(20.13)
20.25519
(20.32)
1.51797
(1.80)***
0.39584
(0.67)
21.12959
(20.81)
21.29045
(21.16)
3.99309
(1.81)***
2.43389
(1.49)
2.61229
(2.00)***
2.98583
(2.31)**
20.08251
(20.08)
20.17981
(20.25)
4.52427
(1.45)
2.05649
(1.04)
Labour growth 0.46764
(2.45)*
0.45587
(2.74)*
0.23917
(1.80)***
0.22345
(2.18)**
0.48521
(2.51)**
0.41823
(2.23)**
20.22503
(20.70)
0.09818
(0.42)
20.18133
(20.87)
20.22505
(21.55)
0.34520
(2.53)**
0.43912
(3.33)*
0.07403
(0.37)
0.12387
(0.87)
Learning by
doing
0.06731
(3.19)*
0.02357
(1.57)***
0.01858
(1.10)
0.01471
(1.07)
0.02984
(2.43)**
0.02041
(1.55)
0.04942
(2.04)**
0.02118
(1.26)
0.26953
(3.94)*
0.19977
(4.03)*
0.02560
(2.08)**
0.03464
(2.98)*
20.01125
(20.71)
20.00213
(20.19)
Human
capital
0.20041
(4.17)*
0.02785
(0.78)
0.04928
(1.18)
0.08575
(1.18)
20.07627
(20.69)
0.08841
(2.20)**
0.11025
(1.82)***
Education and
training
20.08913
(20.20)
0.37265
(3.82)*
20.13639
(20.59)
0.08318
(0.24)
0.52046
(0.95)
0.98549
(2.82)*
0.52633
(0.76)
Technology
gap
25.33767
(26.64)*
22.25395
(3.82)*
22.73439
(25.64)*
23.04810
(25.02)*
20.87227
(25.87)*
22.41062
(23.39)*
23.19066
(24.89)*
Real exchange
Rate
20.02963
(20.60)
20.07732
(22.25)**
20.06106
(21.51)
20.07811
(22.41)**
20.13964
(23.83)*
20.11399
(23.74)*
20.12597
(23.06)*
20.08180
(22.61)*
20.33944
(22.46)**
20.30676
(22.61)**
20.08565
(22.00)**
20.06054
(22.03)**
0.01439
(0.22)
20.02301
(20.43)
Constant 3.87943
(0.59)
20.65596
(4.25)*
14.54761
(2.48)**
18.65215
(4.22)*
23.46286
(4.18)*
23.71362
(5.74)*
19.83040
(3.95)*
17.68807
(4.03)*
46.38253
(2.78)*
42.72019
(2.96)*
16.72060
(2.91)*
17.72980
(4.36)*
7.76355
(0.87)
12.02118
(1.67)***
Hansen test
( p-value)
0.30 0.12 0.15 0.38 0.11 0.13 0.15 0.48 0.26 0.33 0.38 0.16 0.24 0.25
Durbin-Wu-
Hausman test
( p-value)
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Pagan-Hall
test
( p-value)
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.01 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Observations 114 114 99 99 59 59 52 52 52 52 72 72 126 126
Note: Robust t-statistics in parentheses. ***Significant at 10%; **significant at 5%; *significant at 1%. (1) refers to estimation without human capital but with education and training
and technology gap; (2) refers to estimation without human capital.
196 S. Anwar and L.P. Nguyen
The estimated results indicate that the effect of FDI on economic growth is positive
and significant only in Red River Delta, North East, South East and Mekong River Delta
which can be attributed to the fact that infrastructure, financial system and education
systems in these regions are relatively more developed. Table 8 shows that except for
North Central Coast, the effect of economic growth on FDI in all regions is positive. This
implies that the hypothesis of a two-way linkage between FDI and economic growth holds
only in Red River Delta, North East, South East and Mekong River Delta regions. In
summary, except for H2, data analysis supports all hypotheses.
Discussion
The growth of FDI in Vietnam and its desired effect on economic growth appear to support
the Vietnamese government policy, specifically the Law of Foreign Investment which was
introduced in 1987. Our analysis suggests that in the case of Vietnam, exports and FDI are
complementary which explains why FDI in Vietnam is mainly concentrated in
Table 8. FDI and economic growth across regions of Vietnam – estimation of Equation (2).
Dependent Variable: FDI
Independent
variables
Red River
Delta North East
North Central
Coast
South Central
Coast
Central
Highlands South East
Mekong
River
Delta
Economic
growth
(G)
357.1346
(2.13)**
1420.024
(2.14)**
16.1933
(0.10)
1752.165
(1.84)***
1092.428
(3.43)*
800.5879
(2.24)**
1359.939
(4.36)*
Market size
(Y)
20.35611
(20.73)
1.17561
(2.13)**
0.57826
(2.60)**
0.09475
(0.07)
23.16549
(1.28)
1.48112
(11.20)*
2.35996
(4.69)*
Domestic
investment
(DI)
0.06045
(4.45)*
20.00144
(20.12)
0.00791
(1.66)***
0.19618
(5.10)*
0.01204
(0.51)
0.09811
(4.88)*
20.01034
(20.33)
Exports
(X)
3.52437
(5.64)*
0.00055
(0.09)
1.61541
(2.84)*
0.41549
(0.59)
3.32545
(1.49)
1.12183
(6.99)*
1.31494
(5.89)*
Labour skills
(SKILL)
220.5079
(20.27)
261.04864
(20.29)
28.31117
(20.17)
21.98845
(0.09)
908.0682
(1.56)
2 53.01174
( 2 0.64)
264.8906
(3.96)*
Labour cost
(WA)
23.98111
(22.05)**
29.00163
(23.29)
0.16291
(0.18)
4.76716
(1.06)
23.74196
(22.74)*
29.36981
(24.38)
25.67121
(22.95)*
Infrastructure
(TEL)
29.8732
(1.66)***
46.58105
(2.10)**
1.62203
(0.15)
4.51481
(0.15)
252.2178
(4.04)*
63.50253
(5.05)*
67.3222
(2.35)**
Real
exchange
rate
(RER)
111.8684
(2.21)**
72.02627
(1.02)
14.28568
(0.50)
546.9898
(3.54)*
24.09019
(20.03)
207.5025
(2.80)*
71.84067
(0.87)
Constant 217,005.18
(22.37)**
219,180.60
(21.61)***
22169.047
(20.42)
2966,643.58
(23.56)*
6673.767
(0.28)
236,870.3
(23.19)*
28555.537
(20.67)
Hansen test
( p-value)
0.11 0.38 0.63 0.79 0.19 0.21 0.44
Durbin-Wu-
Hausman
test
( p-value)
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00
Pagan-Hall
test
( p-value)
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Observations
114 99 59 52 52 72 126
Note: Robust t-statistics in parentheses. ***Significant at 10%; **significant at 5%; *significant at 1%.
Asia Pacific Business Review 197
the export-oriented manufacturing sector. Other factors, such as the stock of human
capital, investment in education and training, the level of financial market development
and the extent of technology gap between foreign and local firms are also important
determinants of economic growth in Vietnam. The results presented in this study also
highlight the role of the level of infrastructure development, the availability of skilled
labour and market size in attracting FDI to the Red River Delta and South East regions of
Vietnam.
Our empirical analysis suggests that as far as the level of financial market
development, spending on education and training and technology gap are concerned,
the Vietnamese economy has not reached the required minimum threshold that would
ensure that the indirect effect (also known as the spillover effect) of FDI on economic
growth is positive. In other words, the empirical evidence suggests that Vietnam is
unable to take full advantage of FDI inflows because: (i) its financial market is
insufficiently developed, (ii) spending on education and training is insufficient, and (iii)
technology gap between the foreign and local firms is too large.
Region wise, analysis reveals that a two-way linkage between FDI and economic
growth exists only in four regions: Red River Delta, North East, South East and Mekong
River Delta. This suggests that Vietnam is facing the problem of uneven economic
development. This problem is not specific to Vietnam. Other fast developing economies,
such as China and India, are facing the same problem. Indeed, the ruling party in India lost
the general election held in 2004 due to public dissatisfaction arising from income
distributional concerns.
The issue that is not explicitly considered by this study is the lack of focus in FDI in
Vietnam. Freeman (2002) and Kokko et al. (2003), among others, have argued that FDI
in Vietnam is largely unfocused. While the government of Vietnam has been inviting
foreign investment in all sectors, during the first seven months of 2008, the real estate
and tourism sectors received more than 47% of FDI (GSO 2008). There is also evidence
that FDI is contributing to the trade deficit in Vietnam. Rapid globalization has resulted
in a situation where MNCs are dispersing production activities to various locations
around the globe. Based on its comparative advantage, Vietnam needs to recognize its
place in the value chain. A policy which directs FDI to industries where Vietnam has
cost advantage over competing locations is highly desirable.
Implications
The empirical analysis presented in this study confirms that, in overall terms, an increase
in the stock of FDI increases Vietnam’s economic growth rate which attracts further FDI
into Vietnam. FDI boosting polices are likely to lead to further increase in exports and
hence the rate of economic growth. Policy makers in Vietnam need to develop long-term
strategies that would increase the country’s rate of human capital accumulation. Human
capital growth (for example, through increased spending on advanced education and
training) contributes to economic growth by facilitating the adoption of foreign
technologies. Additional investment in infrastructure development (including transportation
and telecommunication systems) and education are likely to result in a higher level
of foreign investment in Vietnam. The empirical analysis presented in this study also
suggests that the Vietnamese government needs to take immediate steps to: (i) further
develop the local financial market; (ii) increase spending on education and training; and
(ii) reduce the technology gap between the foreign and local firms. These steps will allow
the Vietnamese economy to take greater advantage of FDI-related spillover effects.
198 S. Anwar and L.P. Nguyen
In other words, policy makers need to develop strategies that will enhance the country’s
absorptive capacity. Singapore has been very successful in this regard and policy makers
in Vietnam should consider utilizing some of the successful Singaporean strategies in
Vietnam.
Regional analysis shows that FDI is a significant determinant of economic growth in
only four out of seven regions of Vietnam. This suggests that policy makers need to
develop strategies that would help to attract more FDI to the three regions that are
presently not very attractive to foreign investors. This, among other things, requires better
coordination among different levels of government and industry involvement.
For MNCs, the implication is that while investment in four regions, where there is a
strong mutually reinforcing link between FDI and economic growth, is likely to continue
to result in excellent returns on investment at least in the short term, investment in the
remaining three regions through first mover advantage is likely to lead to handsome
returns in the long-term.
Conclusions
The causal relationship between FDI and economic growth remains an issue of intense
debate among researchers. While this debate has provided rich insights into the
relationship between FDI and economic growth in a number of developing countries, few
empirical studies have considered the case of Vietnam.
By making use of a recently released panel dataset which covers 61 provinces of Vietnam
over the period 1996–2005, this study attempts to examine a series of hypotheses concerning
the link between FDI and economic growth and related issues. The empirical analysis, which
is based on a simultaneous equationsmodel, supports the view that in overall terms amutually
reinforcing two-way linkage between FDI and economic growth exists inVietnam.While the
direct effect of FDI on economic growth inVietnamis positive, the indirect effect through the
economy’s absorptive capacity (as measured by factors such as the level of financial market
development, spending on education and training and the extent of technology gap)was found
to be negative. Finally, we also explored the link between FDI and economic growth across
seven regions of Vietnam.The empirical analysis reveals that a two-way linkage between FDI
and economic growth exists only in four regions:Red RiverDelta,North East, South East and
Mekong River Delta.
Limitations and future research
While the sample size, which is in excess of 500 observations, is sufficiently large for the
present study, comparable provincial data for the period 1988–1995 is not available. It is
therefore not possible to compare the impact of FDI on economic growth during the preand
post-Asian crisis periods. The quality of data as highlighted by Freeman and Nestor
(2004) is also an issue that has to be kept in mind. However, such problems are common in
most developing countries. Due to the lack of data, it was not possible to consider other
variables such as the quality of local government and the level of corruption which
remains a serious concern.
It may also be worthwhile to re-examine the two-way linkage hypothesis and related
issues by using the growth rate of total factor productivity (TFP), instead of the growth rate
of total production. This study uses proxies for some variables such as the level of financial
development and infrastructure development. Future studies should consider using better
proxies. An emerging area of research which has started to receive some attention is
Asia Pacific Business Review 199
measurement of the spillover (that is, indirect) effect of FDI. In other words, most existing
studies on Vietnam have solely considered the direct effect of FDI on economic growth.
Spillover effect can be horizontal, vertical-forward or vertical-backward. It will be useful
to investigate the impact of FDI-related spillovers on total factor productivity. This will
allow one to evaluate the impact of FDI on technological progress in Vietnam. Finally, this
research can be further extended by examining the impact of FDI-led economic growth on
income distribution in Vietnam.
Acknowledgements
The authors are grateful to five anonymous referees for very useful comments and suggestions.
An earlier version of this study was presented to the 2007 Australasian Econometric Society Meeting
held in Queensland, Australia. The authors are grateful to the participants of the meeting for helpful
comments and suggestions. The usual disclaimer applies.
Notes
1. See Keller (2004), Meyer (2003, 2004), Lipsey (2002) and Marino (2002) for an interesting
survey.
2. From 1 January 2008 to 22 April 2008, Vietnam has already attracted FDI in the amount of
US$7.22 billion (GSO 2008).
3. Prior to this, Findlay (1978) has argued that FDI increases the rate of technological progress in
host economies through a ‘contagion’ effect arising from the introduction of more advanced
technology, management practices, and so forth.
4. See Nguyen and Nguyen (2007) and references therein.
5. It is well-known that the GMM method provides consistent and efficient estimates in the
presence of arbitrary heteroskedasticity (Greene 2008). Moreover, most of the diagnostic tests
discussed in this study can be cast in a GMM framework. Hansen’s J-test was used to test for
over-identification of GMM (that is the null hypothesis of correct model specification and valid
over-identifying restrictions was tested and the results were found to be satisfactory).
Notes on contributors
Sajid Anwar is Professor of Finance at the University of the Sunshine Coast. He holds a PhD from the
University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada).
Lan Phi Nguyen is Assistant Professor of Economics at National Economics University (Hanoi,
Vietnam). He holds a PhD from the Univeristy of South Australia.
References
Aghion, P., Comin, D., and Howitt, P., 2006. When does domestic saving matter for economic
growth? NBER working paper no. 12275, Cambridge.
Alfaro, L., Chandna, A., Kalemli-Ozcan, S., and Sayek, S., 2004. FDI and economic growth: the role
of local financial markets. Journal of international economics, 64 (1), 445–465.
Asiedu, E., 2002. On the determinants of foreign direct investment to developing countries: is Africa
different? World development, 30, 107–119.
Balasubramanyam, V. and Salisu, A., 1991. Export promotion, import substitution and direct foreign
investment in less developed countries. In: A. Koekkoek and L. Mennes, eds. International trade
and global development. London: Routledge, 191–210.
Barro, R., 1991. Economic growth in a cross section of countries. Quarterly journal of economics,
106, 407–443.
Barro, R. and Sala-i-Martin, X., 2004. Economic growth. 2nd ed. Cambridge: MIT Press.
Bende-Nabende, A., Ford, J., and Slater, J., 2001. FDI, regional economic integration and
endogenous growth: some evidence from Southeast Asia. Pacific economic review, 6, 383–399.
200 S. Anwar and L.P. Nguyen
Bengoa, M. and Sanchez-Robles, B., 2003. Foreign direct investment, economic freedom and
growth: new evidence from Latin America. European journal of political economy, 19 (3),
529–545.
Berthelemy, J. and De´murger, S., 2000. Foreign direct investment and economic growth: theory and
application to China. Review of development economics, 4 (2), 210–250.
Binh, N. and Haughton, J., 2002. Trade liberalization and foreign direct investment in Vietnam.
ASEAN economic bulletin, 19 (3), 302–318.
Biswas, R., 2002. Determinants of foreign direct investment. Review of development economics, 6
(3), 492–504.
Blankeanu, W., 2005. Public schooling, college subsidies and growth. Journal of economic dynamics
and control, 29 (3), 487–507.
Blankeanu, W. and Simpson, N., 2004. Public education expenditures and growth. Journal of
development economics, 73, 583–605.
Blomstro¨m, M. and Kokko, A., 2001. Foreign direct investment and spillovers of technology.
International journal of technology management, 22 (5/6), 435–454.
Borensztein, E., De Gregorio, J., and Lee, J.W., 1998. How does foreign direct investment affect
economic growth? Journal of international economics, 45 (1), 115–135.
Brainard, L., 1997. An empirical assessment of the proximity-concentration trade-off between
multinational sales and trade. American economic review, 87, 520–544.
Buckley, P., Clegg, L.J., Cross, A.R., Liu, X., Voss, H., and Zheng, P., 2007. The determinants of
Chinese outward foreign direct investment. Journal of international business studies, 38,
499–518.
Chakrabarti, A., 2001. The determinants of foreign direct investment: sensitivity analyses of crosscountry
regressions. Kyklos, 54, 89–113.
De Mello, L., 1997. Foreign direct investment in developing countries and growth: a selective
survey. Journal of development studies, 34 (2), 1–34.
Driffield, N. and Love, J.H., 2007. Linking FDI motivation and host economy productivity effects:
conceptual and empirical analysis. Journal of international business studies, 38, 460–473.
Dunning, J., 1988. The eclectic paradigm of international production: a restatement and some
possible extensions. Journal of international business studies, 19, 1–31.
Durham, J., 2004. Absorptive capacity and the effects of foreign direct investment and equity foreign
portfolio investment on economic growth. European economic review, 48, 285–306.
Findlay, R., 1978. Relative backwardness, direct foreign investment and the transfer of technology:
a simple dynamic mode. Quarterly journal of economics, 92, 1–16.
Freeman, N.J., 2001. Understanding the decline in foreign investor sentiment towards Vietnam
during the 1990s. Asia Pacific business review, 8 (1), 1–18.
Freeman, N.J., 2002. Foreign direct investment in Vietnam: an overview. In: DfID Workshop on
Globalisation and poverty in Vietnam. Working Paper, Hanoi, 23–24 September.
Freeman, N.J. and Nestor, C., 2004. FDI in Vietnam: fuzzy figures and sentiment swings. In: D.
McCargo, ed. Re-thinking Vietnam. London: Routledge, 179–196.
Friedman, M., 1977. Nobel lecture: inflation and unemployment. Journal of political economy, 85,
451–472.
General Statistics Office, 2007. Statistical yearbook 2006. Hanoi: Statistical Publishing House.
General Statistics Office, 2008. General statistics office of Vietnam [online]. Available from: http://
http://www.gso.gov.vn (Accessed 20 June 2008).
Glickman, N. and Woodward, D., 1988. The location of foreign direct investment in the United
States: patterns and determinants. International regional science review, 11, 137–154.
Greene, H., 2008. Econometric analysis. 6th ed. New York: Prentice Hall.
Grossman, G. and Helpman, E., 1991. Innovation and growth in the global economy. Cambridge:
MIT Press.
GSO. See General Statistics Office.
Hermes, N. and Lensink, R., 2003. Foreign direct investment, financial development and economic
growth. Journal of development studies, 40 (1), 142–163.
Hill, S. and Munday, M., 1992. The regional distribution of foreign direct investment: analysis and
determinants. The journal of the regional studies association, 26 (6), 535–544.
Husain, A., Mody, A., and Rogoff, K., 2005. Exchange rate regime durability and performance in
developing versus advanced economies. Journal of monetary economics, 52, 35–64.
Asia Pacific Business Review 201
Jackson, S. and Markowski, S., 1995. The attractiveness of countries to foreign direct investment.
Journal of world trade, 29, 159–180.
Kamin, S. and Rogers, J., 2000. Output and the real exchange rate in developing countries: an
application to Mexico. Journal of development economics, 61, 85–109.
Keller, W., 2004. International technology diffusion. Journal of economic literature, XLII,
752–782.
King, R. and Levine, R., 1993. Finance and growth: Schumpeter might be right. Quarterly journal of
economics, 108, 717–738.
Kokko, A., Kotoglou, K., and Krohwinkel-Karlsson, A., 2003. Characteristics of failed FDI projects
in Viet Nam. Transnational corporations, 12 (3), 41–77.
Kravis, I. and Lipsey, R., 1982. Location of overseas production and production for export by US
multinational firms. Journal of international economics, 12, 201–223.
Li, X. and Liu, X., 2005. Foreign direct investment and economic growth: an increasingly
endogenous relationship. World development, 33, 393–407.
Lipsey, R., 2002. Home and host country effects of FDI. NBER working paper no. 9293.
Lucas, R., 1988. On the mechanics of economic development. Journal of monetary economics, 22,
3–42.
Lucas, R., 1993. On the determinants of US direct investment in the EEC: further evidence.
European economics review, 13, 93–101.
Mai, P.H., 2003. The economic impact of foreign direct investment flows on Vietnam: 1988–1998.
Asian studies review, 27 (1), 81–98.
Marino, A., 2002. The impact of FDI on developing countries growth: trade policy matters.
CEMAFI, Working Paper, Universite´ de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, France.
Meyer, K., 2003. FDI spillovers in emerging markets: a literature review and new perspectives. DRC
working paper, no. 15.
Meyer, K., 2004. Perspectives on multinational enterprises in emerging economies. Journal of
international business studies, 35, 259–276.
Moore, M., 1993. Determinants of German manufacturing direct investment: 1980–1988.
Weltwirtschaftliches archiv, 129, 120–138.
Mudambi, R., 1995. The MNE investment location decision: some empirical evidence. Mangerial
and decision economics, 16, 249–257.
Nguyen, A.N. and Nguyen, T., 2007. Foreign direct investment in Vietnam: an overview and
analysis of the determination of spatial distribution, Development and polices research center,
Working Paper, Hanoi, Vietnam.
Presbitero, A., 2006. Institutions and geography as sources of economic development. Journal of
international development, 18 (3), 351–378.
Rodrik, D., 1992. Closing the productivity gap: does trade liberalization really help? Oxford:
Clarendon Press.
Romer, M., 1986. Increasing returns and long-run growth. Journal of political economy, 94,
1002–1037.
Sachs, J., 2003. Institutions don’t rule: direct effects of geography on per-capita income. NBER
working paper no. 9490.
Tsai, P., 1994. Determinants of FDI and its impact on economic growth. Journal of economic
development, 19, 137–162.
Wang, Y. and Gu, W., 2006. FDI, absorptive capacity, and productivity growth: the role of interindustry
linkages. Working Paper, Social Sciences Research Network, No. 924771.
202 S. Anwar and L.P. Nguyen

Advertisements

FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT IN VIETNAM AND ITS IMPACT ON ECONOMIC GROWTH Hossein Varamini, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, USA Anh Vu, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, USA

Filed under: Uncategorized — ktetaichinh @ 3:49 am
Tags:

􀀃http://www.viet-studies.info/kinhte/FDI_Growth_VN_2.pdf
􀀃
FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT IN VIETNAM AND ITS IMPACT ON ECONOMIC GROWTH
Hossein Varamini, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, USA
Anh Vu, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, USA
ABSTRACT
While a large amount of existing literature discusses the relationship between Foreign Direct Investment
(FDI) and economic growth, very few empirical studies have been carried out for Vietnam, one of the
fastest growing economies in the world. This paper reviews the experience of Vietnam in attracting FDI
and examines the relationship between economic growth and FDI, utilizing data on FDI inflows, GDP,
Export and Money Supply of Vietnam during the last two decades. The results suggest that FDI is an
important factor for the growth of the Vietnam’s economy.
Keywords: Foreign Direct Investment, FDI, Vietnam, Economic Growth
1. INTRODUCTION
Prior to 1986, Vietnam witnessed tremendously tough challenges: the aftermath of war, social evils, the
mass flow of refugees, the war at the southwest border with Cambodia, the dispute at the northern border
with China, the isolation and embargo from the United States and Western countries, in addition to
continual natural calamities. In 1986, the Vietnamese government launched the “Doi Moi” or all-round
renovation process; the country started to shift from a centrally-planned economy to a socialist-oriented
market economy. One year after the Doi Moi, the Law on Foreign Direct Investment was passed by the
VII National Assembly. Since then, annual Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows into Vietnam have
increased dramatically from USD 0.34 billion in 1988 to $5.3 billion in 2005, with an annual growth rate of
28 percent (GSO, 2006). During this period, FDI inflows to Vietnam have played a very important role
such as stimulating export activities, introducing technology know-how, generating job opportunities, and
providing the capital to meet the economic growth target. The Vietnam economy has shown a remarkable
performance as one of the fastest growing economies in the world. After three decades of transforming
from a central-planned economy to a form of capitalism, it is now Asia’s second-fastest-growing economy,
with the annual growth rate of 8.4 percent, trailing only China. This paper provides an overview of FDI in
Vietnam and studies the impact of FDI on GDP growth in this country. The analysis is important for
Vietnam in designing government policies to enhance economic development. It also contributes to the
literature of FDI and economic growth in general and Vietnam in particular.
2. AN OVERVIEW OF FDI IN VIETNAM
FDI activities in Vietnam can be divided into four main time periods: 1988-1990, 1991-1995, 1996-2000
and 2001-2005. The opening of Vietnam economy to FDI in 1987 along with other subsequent measures
to liberalize the FDI regime led to rapid increase of FDI inflows from 1988-1996. FDI inflows rose from
2.47% in 1987 to 34.89% of GDP in 1996. According to the Foreign Investment Advisory Service (FIAS)
of World Bank, Vietnam had the highest level of FDI as percentage of GDP among all the developing and
transition economies during this period. Factors that stimulated the foreign investor appetite for Vietnam
included the market size, the attractiveness of a transitional economy, the strong work ethos, the high
levels of education yet relatively low labor rate, plentiful resources, and so on. Geographical location was
also one reason that led to the impressive rise in FDI inflows to Vietnam. Freeman (2002) suggested that
during 1980s and 1990s, there was a “bull market” flood of foreign capital into the merging market. And
within “the emerging market universe” Southeast Asia was a major beneficiary of this capital flow. In
1990, for example, Southeast Asia attracted 36% of all FDI flows to developing countries and the region
exceed China’s FDI inflows by more than three times (Freeman, 2002). The author also observed that
there was a flow of foreign capital into the transitional economies of the former socialist bloc, where new
business opportunities (and profits) could exist. Another force was the beginning of substantial
intraregional FDI flows within Southeast Asia as countries such as Malaysia, Thailand and Singapore
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, Volume VII, Number 6, 2007 132
􀀃
􀀃
began to export capital. Freeman concluded that as a transitional economy, located in Southeast Asia,
Vietnam was “very well positioned to ride” the three forces (Freeman, 2002).
The impressive growth of FDI however was abruptly interrupted after 1996, from 34.89% to 17.65%. The
1997 Asian crisis played a part, since the bulk of FDI in Vietnam in the early 1990s had come from these
countries. However, according to Jenkins (2006), the beginning of the downward trend in FDI was already
evident before the crisis hit. Some scholars suggested that it was because the economic reform process
in Vietnam was slowing down in the mid 1990s, while others emphasize the “euphoric” nature of
expectations concerning investment opportunities in the country, which were almost bound to be
disappointed (Freeman, 2002). Freeman explained that after nearly a decade, all the business
embargoes had now been lifted, all the international business who wanted to be in Vietnam, were already
present. Besides, the forecasts for domestic demand were proved to be exaggerated. The hurdles to
business also became more apparent.
An important feature of FDI in Vietnam is that it comes from a wide variety of countries. In fact, investors
from 76 different countries and economies have invested in Vietnam during the past two decades, but the
United States is not the dominant investor. Singapore (14.08%), Taiwan (13.07%), Japan (10.43%), and
Korea (9.28%) are the biggest investors with 46.85% of the total committed capital. Nguyen Phi Lan
(2006) in his study observed that FDI inflows from these big investors fluctuated considerably from 1995
to 2005 because of the Asian financial crisis, such countries maintained relative constant FDI positions in
Vietnam. In contrast, European countries such as France, the Netherlands, Germany and United
Kingdom have shown declining FDI positions. But according to the author, these reductions were
exchanged with the growth of FDI from the United States, British Virgin Islands, Luxembourg and China.
The growth from the United States has increased during the past years, but its investment volume is still
low compared to its potential. The United States in fact, ranks ninth, partly because the flows only began
after the embargo was lifted in 1994. And even with the 1994 embargo lift, there were still a lot of
obstacles for American companies to invest in Vietnam.
In December 2001, the bilateral trade agreement (BTA) between Vietnam and the US went into effect.
The US agreed to grant most favor nation (MFN) status to Vietnam. Haughton and Nguyen (2002)
quantify the effect that BTA had on FDI flows to Vietnam by using data from 16 Asian countries for 1990-
1999. They found out that BTA lead to 30% more FDI into Vietnam in the first year, and an eventual
doubling of the flow. This also boosted the economic growth by 0.6 percent annually. BTA is explained to
affect the flow of FDI in four main ways. First, it makes foreign investment easier by requiring Vietnam to
change from its current licensing regime to a registration system. (Registration is automatic while license
involves permission). Second, BTA makes Vietnam a more attractive platform with an open access to the
US market, the biggest economy in the world. The authors took an example that Korean footwear firms
are more likely to expand their existing factories in Vietnam in order to better serve the US market. Third,
the BTA in some way ensure the US investors of doing business in Vietnam and lastly, the BTA forces
Vietnam to open up more of the economy and reduce barriers to FDI (Haughton & Nguyen Nhu Binh,
2002).
With government’s initiatives of public administrative reform and economic reform towards openness and
global integration, Vietnam’s FDI increased again to $5.3 billion in 2005. Of the total figure, more than $3
billion came from 970 newly licensed FDI projects and the rest from additional investment injected into
existing projects. The total number of licensed projects invested in by foreigners has increased from 37 in
1988 to 7,279 in 2005, worth a total of $66.20 billion over the period 1988-2005 (GSO).
Most of the investment in Vietnam have focused on industries such as manufacturing (50.11%), real
estate (9.45%), construction (7.81%), hotels and restaurants (7.78%), transport (7.04%) and concentrated
their investments geographically in key economic areas in the south as Ho Chi Minh City, Dong Nai, Binh
Duong, Baria Vung Tau and key economic areas in the north such as Hanoi, Ha Duong, Hung Yen, Hai
Phong and Quang Ninh. From 1988 to 2005, Ho Chi Minh City attracted the most FDI (24 percent of the
total capital) and accounted for over $15.87 billion, followed by Hanoi with 17 percent of total capital,
equivalent to over $11.47 billion.
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, Volume VII, Number 6, 2007 133
􀀃
􀀃
3. LITERATURE REVIEW
Prior to 1986, Vietnam as well as many other Communist countries such as China, Cambodia, and Cuba
was influenced by Marxist radical view on political and economic theory. According to Marx and other
radical writers, multinational corporations (MNC) are an instrument of imperialist domination and a tool for
exploiting host countries to the exclusive benefit of their home countries. MNCs extract profits from the
host country and take them to their home country, give nothing of value to the host country in exchange.
FDI by MNCs therefore keeps the less developed countries relatively backward and dependent on
advanced capital nations for investment, jobs, technology, and economic growth (Hill, 2006). By the end
of the 1980s, the radical position was however retreat almost everywhere, including Vietnam.
Existing literature often discusses the relation between FDI and growth based on the theories of
exogenous growth and endogenous growth. Exogenous growth model, also known as the Neo-classical
model or Solow growth model, was developed by Robert Solow, Nobel Prize Winner in 1987 for his work
on this model. Empirical tests based on this theory conclude that output growth results from factors such
as increases in labor quality and quantity through population growth and education, increases in capital
through foreign capital and progress in technology. The long-run rate of growth for a country is
exogenously determined by assuming a savings rate or a rate of technical progress (Solow, 1956).
However, the criticism of exogenous model is that it fails to explain why or how technological progress
occurs. This failing has led to the development of endogenous growth theory.
Endogenous growth theory takes the Solow model one step further by explaining the effect of FDI on
economic growth through knowledge spillover and the existence of human capital. Knowledge spillover is
a channel of knowledge (technology) transfer from foreign subsidiaries to host country firms, which have
been widely studied by various scholars. Blomstrom and Kokko (1998) revise the four channels of FDI
spillover. Demonstration-imitation effect occurs when domestic firms learn superior technologies from
foreign subsidiaries. Competition effect happens when foreign subsidiaries competition force domestic
rivals to update their technologies and techniques. Foreign linkage effect implies that domestic firms also
learn to export from foreign subsidiaries. Training effect suggests that there is always a movement of staff
from foreign subsidiaries to domestic firms and training course for local employees (Blomstrom & Kokko,
1998). As a result of knowledge spillover, local firms can increase their output growth and hence
contribute to the increase of GDP growth.
Many studies compared the efficiency between FDI and domestic investment. For developing countries,
FDI has proved to be more efficient than domestic investment (Borenzstein et al., 1998). De Gregorio
(1992) in his study finds that FDI was three times more efficient than domestic investment. Blomstrom et
al. (1992) confirms that is no evidence of “crowd out” effect on domestic investment. In contrast, after
running the model for 12 countries during the period 1971-2000, Agosin and Machado (2005) conclude
that in three developing regions (African, Asia and Latin America), FDI has left domestic investment
unchanged. There are several sub-periods for specific regions where FDI displaces domestic investment.
In particular, there seems to be crowding out of domestic investment by FDI in Latin America. The
empirical findings of existing literature find a mixed result for the impact of FDI on domestic investment.
The effects of FDI, therefore, are not always favorable.
Another interesting finding is that many studies stress the importance of human capital for FDI. Nelson
and Phelps (1996) suggest that larger stock of human capital makes it easier to absorb new products and
ideas brought from multinational corporations (MNCs). Human capital is important for countries to benefit
from the entrance of long-term capital flows. Barro (1991) used a sample of 98 countries in the period of
1960-1985 to conclude that the growth rate of real per capita GDP is positively related to initial human
capital. Since FDI increases human capital and human capital fosters economic growth, FDI has a
positive impact on economic growth. Borenzstein et al. (1998) take the importance of human capital to the
next level when they discover that with low levels of human capital, FDI actually has a negative impact on
economic growth. The study used data on FDI flows from industrial countries to 69 developing countries
over the last two decades and the result suggested that FDI is an important vehicle for transfer of
technology, contributing relative more to growth than domestic investment.
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, Volume VII, Number 6, 2007 134
􀀃
􀀃
The impact of FDI on economic growth has been an interest for many empirical studies. An empirical
analysis by Alfaro et al. (2002) using cross-country data for the period of 1975-1995 suggests that total
FDI exerts an ambiguous effect on economic growth. However, countries with well-developed financial
markets gain significantly from FDI. Wang (2003) finds that FDI in manufacturing sector has a positive
impact on economic growth of host economies; but FDI in non-manufacturing sectors does not play a
significant role in promoting economic growth.
Many samples from different locations of the world have also been tested and taken into consideration.
Sánchez-Robles & Bengoa-Calvo (2002) explore empirically the interplay between economic freedom,
FDI and economic growth. They pursue a panel data analysis on a sample of 18 Latin-America countries
over the period of 1970-1999. The result implements that first, economic freedom in host country is found
to be positive determinant of FDI inflows and second, FDI is positively correlated with economic growth in
the host countries of the example considered. The authors also point out that human capital, economic
stability and liberalized markets in host countries are important for the countries to benefit from the
entrance of long term capital flows.
Graham and Wada (2001) applied an econometric test of whether FDI in China had contributed to
increase the total factor productivity growth in provinces that have received large amounts of FDI. The
tests suggested that the result was positive, and hence that FDI had contributed significantly to economic
growth in China beyond that which results from faster capital accumulation. Bende-Nabende et al. (2001)
also studied the casual relationship between FDI and economic growth of the ASEAN-5 economies over
the period of 1970-1996. The study found that FDI has promoted economic growth most effectively
through human capital factors and learning by doing effects.
Empirical studies have been conducted in different areas and countries of the world to examine the
relationship between FDI and economic growth; however, not much literature has been found for the case
of Vietnam. One main obstacle is that there is not enough data available to conduct any system of
regression equation; hence the sample might be small due to a short timeframe.
In an attempt to study the linkage between FDI and economic growth, Nguyen Phi Lan (2006) used three
statistical techniques in analyzing a panel dataset for 61 Vietnamese provinces over the period of 1996-
2003. The empirical result implies that FDI has a positive and statistically significant impact on economic
growth in Vietnam over the period 1996-2003. After reviewing the Eclectic Theory of FDI by Dunning and
other studies by Chakrabarti (2001), Asiedu (2002) and Zhao (2003), Nguyen Phi Lan tests the other way
of the linkage and finds that economic growth is an important factor to lure FDI inflows into Vietnam.
In addition, the author points out some other interesting findings. Labor force and exports have a positive
impact on FDI, which is consistent with the fact that FDI in Vietnam mainly concentrated on laborintensive
and export-oriented manufacturing activities. The study also provides new evidence on the role
of human capital and infrastructure in attracting FDI in Vietnam. Another important result from Nguyen Phi
Lan’s regression is that FDI in Vietnam crowds in domestic investment in Vietnam over the period 1996-
2003.
4. METHODOLOGY
4.1 DATA
The data for the study was collected from a wide variety of resources, namely the World Development
Indicators (World Bank), International Financial Statistics (IMF), and other Vietnamese government
websites, including the General Statistic Office of Vietnam (GSO) and Ministry of Planning & Investment
(MPI). One set was annual data from 1989 to 2005. The starting year, 1989, was the year that Vietnam
started to witness the positive outcomes of “Doi Moi” and 2005 was one year before Vietnam joined the
World Trade Organization. The second set of data consisted of quarterly figures from 1996 to 2005.
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, Volume VII, Number 6, 2007 135
􀀃
􀀃
4.2 MODEL
The empirical segment of this study is based on the application of the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS)
technique to examine the relationship between FDI and the level of economic growth for Vietnam.
However, before running the regression analysis, we need to test for the stationarity of the data. The nonstationarity
of any type of time series may raise serious doubts about the consistency of the estimated
coefficients. One of the most common methods of correcting for non-stationary time series data is to use
the first differences of the series. However, this method imposes many unit roots for the variable and
some potentially important information may be lost. An alternative method is to use the Dickey-Fuller unit
root test (Dickey and Fuller, 1979 and 1981). This test of the unit root determines whether or not the
variables in the study are stationary. In the presence of unit roots for the time series data, this study will
follow Engle and Granger (1987) to construct the co-integration model.
As mentioned above, most time series data follow a pattern and therefore are non-stationary. Let’s
assume two of the time series variables in this study, xt (the level of GDP) and yt (the amount of exports)
are non-stationary variables. If the first difference of each time series is stationary, i.e. Dxt and Dyt are
both I(0), the series are integrated of order 1. If there is a linear combination of xt and yt such as zt= yt – 􀁄
xt in which zt is stationary, then xt and yt are co-integrated. Let’s further assume the following general
regression model:
xt = a + b yt + zt
where zt is the residual of the model. The application of OLS to this equation is appropriate only if xt and
yt are stationary, or if the two series are co-integrated. In other words, co-integration requires that their
first differences (Dxt and Dyt) be stationary and that the residuals of the model (zt) exhibit a stationary
process. This study will apply the DF test to the first differences of the time series as well as the residuals
to test their stationarity status.
The final step is to identify the appropriate regression models to test for the impact of FDI on economic
growth of Vietnam. The following regression equations are developed to examine the statistical
relationship between the variables in the model:
g = 􀄮 + 􀈕1 FDI + 􀈕2 X + 􀈕3 M + μ (1)
g = 􀄮 + 􀈕1 GDP
FDI + 􀈕2 GDP
Export + 􀈕3 M + μ (2)
GDP = 􀄮 + 􀈕1 FDI + 􀈕2 X + 􀈕3 M + μ (3)
Based on theoretical and empirical research on the impact of FDI on economic growth, a system of
equation is formed in which the real economic growth rate (g) and level of real GDP (GDP) are
determined by FDI inflow (FDI), real money supply (M), and level of export (X). The error term, μ,
represents an error term with zero expectations. Previous findings point out that there is a positive
relationship between FDI and economic growth so a positive 􀈕1 is expected.
4.3 REGRESSION ANALYSIS
The first step in using time series analysis is to test for stationarity of the data used. Table 1 shows the
results of the Dickey-Fuller Unit Root test. The DF test is conducted for the levels of FDI, money supply
and exports for Vietnam. As shown in Table 1, even though the levels of some of the variables are nonstationary,
their differences are stationary. These findings allow us to apply regression analysis to data for
this country.
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, Volume VII, Number 6, 2007 136
􀀃
􀀃
TABLE 1: UNIT ROOT TEST
Variables DF statistics w/o lags DF statistics with lags
FDI – 7.18 *** (0) –
Money supply 2.31 (0) 2.73 * (2)
GDP 15.68*** (0) –
Export 0.89 (0) 2.90* (3)
Level of significance *** 1% ** 5% * 10%
Numbers in parentheses are the number of lags.
The results of the regression models are presented in Table 2. The first dataset (annual data) is tested for
model (1) and (2) while the second dataset (quarterly data) is tested for model (2) and (3). As shown in
Table 2, except for model (1) (which is based on Nguyen Phi Lan’s model) that indicates a negative
relationship between the level of export and economic growth rate, the results of other models show that
there are statistically significantly positive relationships between FDI, export, money supply and GDP. The
use of quarterly data for the last model gives the best result when 98% of variability of change in the level
of GDP can be explained by the change in the level of FDI, export and money supply.
TABLE 2: REGRESSION RESULTS
Model 􀄮 FDI
Inflow Export Money
Supply
g= 6.23 + 5.6 FDI – (4.49) Ex + 1.01 M + μ
Adj. R Square = 48.98% 11.94*** 4.27*** -2.04** 2.04**
g= 5.69 + 11.30 (FDI / GDP)+ 1.38 (EX/GDP) + 1.07 M(g)+ μ
Adj. R Square = 48.83% 8.13*** 3.98*** 2.15*** -1.6*
g= 0.01 + 0.06 (FDI / GDP)+ 0.05 (EX/GDP) + 0.001 M(g)+ μ
Adj. R Square = 29.75%
5.52*** 1.22* 4.16** 0.17*
GDP= 22361+ 2.24 FDI + 0.85 EX + 1.41 M+ μ
Adj. R Square = 98% 44.2*** -2.8*** 2.6*** 8.04***
p-value *** 1% ** 5% * 10%
5. CONCLUSIONS
The results of the study are consistent with the findings of several available studies in the literature as
they suggest that there is a statistically significant relationship between FDI and the rate of economic
growth in Vietnam. In order to maintain a high economic growth and increase the export volume,
Vietnamese government should open up more to FDI by revising some of its policies. As a global trend in
recent years, MNCs have been reluctant to enact new projects; merger and acquisition, as an alternative,
has been the main engine for FDI flow. Meanwhile FDI projects in Vietnam are mostly focused on greenfield
activity where new production capacity is created. Vietnam’s business legislation, in fact, does not
allow foreign investor to acquire more than 30% of total shares in local company, if this company
operates in one of the 35 approved business sectors. Furthermore, the existence of bureaucracy, red
tape, inadequate legal infrastructure, weak law enforcing, poor physical infrastructure, corruption, high
land rates, tax rates, IPR, etc. might discourage MNCs investing FDI in Vietnam. The banking and
financial sector are also areas that need renovation in order to attract foreign portfolio investment to
support FDI inflows.
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, Volume VII, Number 6, 2007 137
􀀃
􀀃
The study could have included other independent variables such as real exchange rate, interest rate,
government expenditure, etc. However, the interest rates were skyrocketing until mid 1990s and
exchange rates changes were thrilling. For example, exchange rate in 1986 jumped by hundreds
percentages due to more than 700% inflation in 1986 from 1985. Annual data of a longer time period (for
example, from 1975 to 2005) could have been used to provide more accurate results. However, Vietnam
was in war with the U.S. from 1954 to 1975. After the war, the country was in the wakes of
reconstructions and reforms, collecting statistics became a difficult task due to government controls and
devastations of war. The authors were unable to find any reliable data for the period of 1975-1988.
On January 12, 2007, Vietnam became the WTO’s 150th member following a decision by the General
Council to approve the Southeast Asian country’s membership agreement. This day also marked a full
normalization of Vietnam and the United States relations. Such developments have provided new
opportunities for Vietnam particularly in its ability to attract and maintain FDI. However, the country still
faces some serious challenges on its path to become a more prominent member of the global economy.
REFERENCES:
Agosin, M. & Mayer, R., “Foreign Investment in Developing Countries: Does it Crowd in Domestic
Investment?”, Oxford Development Studies, Vol. 33, No. 2, 2005, 149 – 162.
Alfaro, L., Kalemli-Ozcan, S., Chanda, A. & Sayek, S., “FDI and Economic Growth: The Role of Local
Financial Market”, SSRN Working Paper No. 01-083t, 2002.
Asiedu, E., “On the determinants of foreign direct investment to developing countries: is Africa different?”
Econometrica, Vol. 54, 2002, 869-880.
Barro, R., “Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries”, National Bureau of Economic Research
Working Papers No. 3120, 1991.
Bende-Nabende, A., Ford, J. & Slatter, J., “FDI, Regional Economic Integration and Endogenous Growth:
Some Evidence from SouthEast Asia”, Pacific Economic Review, Vol. 6, No. 3, 2001, 383-399.
Blomstrom, M., Lipsey, R. & Zejan M., “What Explains Developing Country Growth”, National Bureau of
Economic Research Working Paper No. 4132, 1992.
Blomstrom, M. & Kokko, A., “Multinational Corporations and Spillovers”, Journal of Economic Surveys,
Vol. 12, No. 2, 1998, 1-31.
Borensztein, E. & Gregorio, J.D. & Lee, J.W., “How Does Foreign Direct Investment Affect Economic
Growth?”, Journal of International Economics, Vol. 45, 1998, 115-135.
Chakrabarti, A., “The determinants of foreign direct investment: sensitivity analyses of cross-country
regressions”, BTA and Foreign Direct Investment to Vietnam, Vol. 54, 2001, 89-113.
De Gregorio, J., “Economic Growth in Latin America”, Journal of Development Economics, 39, 1992, 58-
84.
Dickey, D.A. and W.A. Fuller, “Distribution of the Estimates for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit
Root,” Journal of the American Statistical Association, Vol. 24, June 1979, 427-451.
Dickey, D.A. and W.A. Fuller, “Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit
Root,” Econometrica, Vol. 49, July 1981, 1057-1072.
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, Volume VII, Number 6, 2007 138

MỘT SỐ QUAN NIỆM ĐƯƠNG ĐẠI VỀ XÃ HỘI DÂN SỰ- TRẦN HỮU QUANG

Filed under: Uncategorized — ktetaichinh @ 3:47 am
Tags: ,

http://www.viet-studies.info/kinhte/TranHuuQuang_XaHoiDansu_2.pdf

Chủ tịch Hồ Chí Minh và người học trò Võ Văn Kiệt

Filed under: Uncategorized — ktetaichinh @ 3:46 am
Tags:

Lý thuyết là mầu xám, cây đời mãi mãi xanh tươi – một triết lý sâu sắc, đơn giản, trở thành câu thơ nổi tiếng của Goethe trong vở kịch “Faust”, thường được cố Thủ tướng Phạm Văn Đồng nhắc đi nhắc lại với nhiều người chung quanh mình trong công việc, đến mức trở thành một quan niệm, một phương thức làm việc, và còn hơn thế nữa: một phương thức và một lẽ sống…

Sau này, trong những ngày được giúp cố Thủ tướng Võ Văn Kiệt, tôi có dịp làm “nhân chứng” cho ảnh hưởng lan tỏa của điều nhắc nhủ nêu trên.

Một lần tình cờ tôi hỏi Anh Sáu Dân, nhân lúc đang phải triết lý về cuộc đời:

– Anh Sáu ạ, điều gì khiến anh có ấn tượng sâu sắc như vậy khi anh thường nói với chúng tôi về lời nhắc nhủ của anh Tô (Thủ tướng Phạm Văn Đồng)?

– Chuyện đó quan trọng lắm: Điều nhắc nhủ ấy của Anh Tô khiến tôi hiểu Ông Cụ đầy đủ hơn, dậy tôi cách học Ông Cụ, không như thế thì không thể hiểu được Ông Cụ! – Anh Sáu nói như thế về Bác Hồ với tất cả kính yêu và mến phục của mình.

Ngày tháng vùn vụt trôi đi trong công việc ngập đầu, hầu như không thấy Anh Sáu viện dẫn sách vở hay lý luận ra để giải thích quyết định của mình. Ngay cả trong những công việc rất khó, Anh Sáu không lý luận dài dòng,  mà đi thẳng vào tình huống, vào công việc, nói rõ mục đích phải đạt được. Đôi ba lần, gặp phải công việc còn nhiều ý kiến tranh cãi ngang ngửa, nếu cần thúc giục những người chung quanh động não góp ý, tôi thấy Anh Sáu không áp đặt ý kiến của mình, mà thường nhắc đến những quyết định của Chủ tịch Hồ Chí Minh trong những giờ phút quyết định vận mệnh đất nước, hoặc trong tình huống hiểm nghèo.

– Không chần chừ được. Thời cơ không chờ đợi! Nếu Bác không quyết nắm lấy thời cơ thì làm sao có Cách Mạng Tháng Tám, làm sao thành công được!.. Cứ suy nghĩ kỹ mà xem… Khó khăn của chúng ta bây giờ ăn nhằm gì!..

– Phải đi nước ngoài thương thuyết trong tình hình đất nước nghìn cân treo sợi tóc, việc quán xuyến cả đất nước Bác trao vào tay cụ Huỳnh Thúc Kháng. Đức độ nào, tầm nhìn và sự từng trải nào khiến Bác dám quyết như vậy?

– Vân… vân…

– …

Anh Sáu không giải thích, không nói nhiều, mà cứ nêu câu hỏi như thế, đòi hỏi mọi người chung quanh phải suy nghĩ, phải noi gương.., để tìm ra giải pháp cho vấn đề đang đặt ra trước mặt!

Bác Hồ… Ảnh tư liệu

Tôi nhớ lại đấy là những lúc Anh yêu cầu chúng tôi tìm mọi lý lẽ và chuẩn bị mọi việc để trình bầy với Bộ Chính trị quyết định những việc hệ trọng:  sớm bình thường hóa quan hệ với Mỹ, gia nhập ASEAN, gia nhập Tổ chức Thương mại Thế giới (WTO)… Trong bối cảnh lúc bấy giờ, cần nói thẳng thắn là phía ta có “hội chứng Mỹ” rất nặng, rất lo ngại “diễn biến hòa bình”, đầy nghi ngờ  sự thao túng của các nước lớn đối với WTO, lo mở cửa nền kinh tế chế độ chính trị của đất nước sẽ bị uy hiếp, vân vân…

Khổ một nỗi hồi ấy lực cản đối với những quyết định hệ trọng như thế rất lớn! Gần như là một lẽ tự nhiên! Kể cả trong hàng ngũ trí thức nữa, chứ không phải chỉ trong những cán bộ chính trị! Hiểu rõ lịch sử vô cùng gian truân đất nước đã trải qua, sẽ hiểu được sự giằng co quyết liệt này để quyết định cho đất nước những bước đi tất yếu như vậy!

Tôi không muốn tôn sùng vai trò cá nhân, nhưng nhìn lại lịch sử thì cần công bằng. Trong sự hiểu biết của mình, tôi dám cả quyết cố Thủ tướng Võ Văn Kiệt, kể cả sau này với tư cách Cố vấn, thực sự là người tiên phong của những người đi tiên phong trong lựa chọn những quyết định thay đổi hẳn cục diện đất nước như vừa trình bầy trên.

Trong những năm tháng ấy, tâm sự với chúng tôi, Anh Sáu cho biết, Anh luôn luôn nghĩ đến những quyết định và việc làm của Bác, để học tập, để noi gương, để mổ xẻ cặn kẽ tình huống công việc mình đang đối mặt.., nhất là để kiên định quan điểm và sự lựa chọn quyết định của chính mình. Trong những năm tháng giúp anh Sáu, hình như tôi chưa thấy một lần nào có chuyện Anh Sáu nói hay viết “Hồ Chủ tịch nói rằng…”, “Hồ Chủ tịch dạy rằng…”  Quả thực đến nay tôi chưa tìm lại được một diễn văn nào của Anh Sáu trong thời gian tôi giúp việc có trích nguyên văn một câu nói nào đó của Bác! Có điều kiện, tôi sẽ xác minh kỹ hơn để khẳng định điều này. Song tôi tin rằng hầu như ở Anh Sáu không có chuyện lý luận hay ngôn từ theo kiểu trích cú tầm chương như vậy mỗi khi nói về Bác Hồ, dù là trong hội nghị, buổi nói chuyện, hay là trong các cuộc họp bàn công việc với những người chung quanh.

Trong những năm tháng làm việc cạnh Anh Sáu, không dưới một lần, anh em chúng tôi hỏi trực tiếp – đương nhiên là để hiểu rõ cái chất “Sáu Dân” của Anh:

– Anh Sáu ạ, sao anh hay làm trái nghị quyết của Đảng thế?

– Thế thì tôi đáng bị kỷ luật nặng rồi!

– Nếu chiểu theo câu chữ của văn bản chính thức thì không oan Anh Sáu ạ.

– Tôi hiểu câu hỏi của các anh…

Mỗi lần trả lời loại câu hỏi này trong các vấn đề khác nhau, chúng tôi hiểu thêm một khía cạnh mới trong suy nghĩ của Anh.

Không biết bao nhiêu lần Anh thường nói với chúng tôi: Không nên và không được tư duy theo cách đưa đường lối của Đảng vào cuộc sống. Cũng không thể nói “ý Đảng lòng dân” đến mức như là một khuôn sáo… Đúng ra phải nghĩ ngược lại: Đưa cuộc sống vào đường lối chính sách của Đảng, nguyện vọng của dân phải trở thành ý chí của Đảng!.. Tự nhận là con cháu Bác Hồ thì phải làm như thế, học tập Bác thì phải làm như thế…

Anh Sáu hỏi lại chúng tôi nhiều lần: Hãy thử tìm xem, trong Tuyên ngôn Độc lập, rồi đến Hiến pháp 1946, Lời kêu gọi toàn quốc kháng chiến, trong nhiều sự việc quan trọng khác, và ngay cả trong Di chúc của Bác nữa, có thấy chỗ nào Bác làm theo cách “đưa đường lối của Đảng vào cuộc sống” không? Hay là Bác xuất phát từ những đòi hỏi bức thiết của cuộc sống vạch ra chương trình hành động cho đất  nước, cho Đảng?..

Anh Sáu nhấn mạnh: Cái chính là phải trung thành với mục tiêu của cách mạng và không được để lợi ích cá nhân xen vào. Nghĩ được như vậy thì sẽ dám nghĩ, dám làm, dám chịu trách nhiệm… Nghĩ được như thế, mới có thể hiểu được những quyết định có một không hai của Bác Hồ. Anh giục chúng tôi: Các anh cứ đi sâu tìm hiểu, phân tích những quyết định động trời của Bác thời kỳ cách mạng trứng nước, khi quyết định toàn quốc kháng chiến, khi phát động cuộc kháng chiến chống Mỹ cứu nước…[1] Phân tích cho kỹ xem kết luận như vậy có đúng không! Rõ ràng chỉ có Bác mới dám quyết như vậy! Trung thành với sự nghiệp cách mạng mới dám quyết như vậy! Trung thành với “chủ nghĩa” thì không dám và không thể làm như vậy!.. Lần nào cũng thế, Anh Sáu trở nên sôi nổi khác thường khi nói đến những chuyện này.

Chúng tôi hiểu thêm Anh Sáu học Bác như thế nào. Nếu thống kê các việc “làm trái” như thế của Anh Sáu, chắc chắn có thể kết luận: Trong mọi thời kỳ công tác và ở bất kể cương vị gì, Anh Sáu cũng có hàng chuỗi các việc “làm trái” như thế – từ những năm tháng chỉ đạo kháng chiến trong vùng địch hậu, rồi đến cương vị đứng mũi chịu sào Thành phố Hồ Chí Minh vừa mới được giải phóng,  Thủ tướng Chính phủ, Cố vấn…

Quả thực, vấn đề không phải là câu chuyện của câu chữ văn bản chỉ thị hay nghị quyết, mà là điều anh Sáu tâm đắc: … Cây đời mãi mãi xanh tươi

Khi nói đến Bác Hồ, hầu như trong hoàn cảnh nào cũng vậy, Anh Sáu trước hết nói về tinh thần, về ý nghĩa, việc Bác làm, về cách xử sự tình huống của Bác, về cách Bác giải quyết vấn đề…, trước hết là về lòng trung thành vô hạn với lợi ích dân tộc, là ý chí và sự mẫn tiệp của Bác trong sứ mệnh chèo lái con thuyền quốc gia, trong nhiệm vụ là biểu tượng tinh thần của dân tộc, trong cương vị là lãnh tụ sáng lập và rèn luyện Đảng…

Qua những mẩu chuyện cũ anh kể lại khi sống trong vùng địch hậu, cả những lúc cơ sở cách mạng mất trắng từng mảng lớn, bản thân tôi càng hiểu sâu sắc thêm Bác Hồ là linh hồn, là niềm tin bất khuất của đồng bào Nam Bộ trong những năm chiến tranh khốc liệt nhất! Có nhiều mẩu chuyện nhỏ rất cảm động. Anh Sáu tâm sự, nếu không có niềm tin sắt đá như vậy, chính Anh cũng sẽ không dám dựa vào đồng bào, sẽ không có gan quay lại sống với đồng bào và xây dựng cơ sở mới ngay trong vùng địch đã chà đi xát lại sạch bong.

Trong những năm tháng giúp Anh Sáu, điều Anh Sáu nói với chúng tôi nhiều nhất về Chủ tịch Hồ Chí Minh lại là những vấn đề liên quan đến Đảng, cụ thể là vấn đề dân chủ trong Đảng, đổi mới sinh hoạt Đảng, chống sự tha hóa của đảng viên – trước hết là những đảng viên có chức có quyền, về đổi mới xây dựng Đảng. Có lẽ sau này có dịp, nhất là khi bàn đến đổi mới Đảng, các cơ quan nghiên cứu của Đảng nên sưu tầm và công bố những ý kiến đóng góp của Anh Sáu chung quanh chủ đề xây dựng Đảng với tư cách là đảng lãnh đạo đất nước trong thời bình để toàn Đảng và cả nước tham khảo.

… và người học trò xuất sắc Võ Văn Kiệt. Ảnh tư liệu

Câu hỏi lớn nhất bàn về xây dựng Đảng Anh Sáu nêu ra cho chúng tôi là: Vì sao Bác Hồ, chỉ có Đảng với 5000 đảng viên, đã lãnh đạo thành công Cách mạng Tháng Tám và giành lại được đất nước?

Tôi không thể nhớ lại được anh em chúng tôi trong nhóm giúp Anh Sáu, với tính cách nguyên là các thành viên trong Ban Nghiên cứu của Thủ tướng do Anh Sáu thành lập, đã có bao nhiêu cuộc họp bàn và tranh luận với anh Sáu chung quanh chủ đề này. Cứ mỗi  khi buổi thảo luận kết thúc, Anh Sáu thường kết luận với câu hỏi mới, đặt vấn đề mới cho cuộc họp sau. Bao nhiêu cuộc họp như thế thì chịu không nhớ được. Ít nhất là phần lớn các cuộc họp của chúng tôi trong hai, ba năm cuối cùng trước khi Anh Sáu đi xa đều xoay quanh chủ để này. Điều tôi hoàn toàn chắc chắn, cuộc họp cuối cùng của Anh Sáu với chúng tôi, chỉ một hai tuần trước khi Anh Sáu lâm bạo bệnh, là bàn về đổi mới Đảng như thế nào. Viết đến đây, tôi liên tưởng đến lời dặn cuối cùng của Chủ tịch Hồ Chí Minh trong Di chúc của Người: “Ngay sau khi cuộc chống Mỹ, cứu nước của nhân dân ta đã hoàn toàn thắng lợi… Theo ý tôi, việc cần phải làm trước tiên là chỉnh đốn lại Đảng…”.

Trong những năm tháng này, ngoài anh em chúng tôi, Anh Sáu còn đi gặp không biết bao nhiêu chiến hữu và bạn bè của mình ở khắp đất nước. Trong những chuyến đi như vậy, bàn về xây dựng Đảng là chủ đề chính của Anh Sáu. Khi về, Anh kể lại cho chúng tôi nghe nhiều thông tin phong phú vể tình hình các đảng bộ địa phương.

Chủ kiến của Anh Sáu là: Cách mạng Tháng Tám, Bác đã lãnh đạo Đảng với 5000 đảng viên làm nên sự nghiệp, trước hết vì đường lối cách mạng đúng, người lãnh đạo sáng suốt, đảng viên chiến đấu ngoan cường, số lượng đảng viên không phải là điều quyết định… Anh dẫn chứng trong Cách Mạng Tháng Tám nhiều nơi không có đảng viên, nhưng nhân dân hưởng ứng lời kêu gọi của Đảng, tự vùng lên cướp chính quyền, tự lập nên chính quyền cách mạng…

Anh Sáu phân tích: Không tin vào nhân dân, không dựa vào nhân dân như thế làm sao Cách mạng có thể thành công? làm sao có thể bảo vệ được Cách mạng trong những hoàn cảnh ngàn cân treo sợi tóc?.. Vì coi cách mạng là sự nghiệp của nhân dân, vì không độc quyền yêu nước, nên Bác thực hiện được đại đoàn kết dân tộc, trở thành hiện thân của đại đoàn kết dân tộc, thực sự phát huy được sức mạnh vô địch của nhân dân!.. Quan trọng hơn tất cả, chỉ có như vậy, Bác mới làm cho sự nghiệp Cách mạng trở thành sự nghiệp của nhân dân. Anh Sáu thẳng thắn: Phải thừa nhận chính điểm này chúng ta học tập Bác chưa tốt, làm chưa tốt. Bác nói xây dựng nhà nước của dân, do dân vì dân chính là nói theo tinh thần này! Anh Sáu hỏi lại chúng tôi: Trong lịch sử Chính phủ các thời kỳ cho đến nay, có thời kỳ nào có được đông đảo các nhân sỹ trí thức lớn ngoài Đảng tham gia như Chính phủ cụ Hồ sau Cách Mạng Tháng Tám năm 1945 không? Tại sao bây giờ hễ là bộ trưởng nhất thiết cứ phải là uỷ viên Trung ương mà lại không phải là trí thức có đức có tài đúng với lĩnh vực phụ trách? Ngoài Đảng cũng được chứ sao?.. Tại sao bây giờ không chọn được người tài đức vào đúng chỗ đúng việc? Đảng ta bây giờ với 3 triệu đảng viên, nếu cứ 3 loại đi 2 yếu kém, Đảng vẫn còn được một triệu đảng viên có đủ phẩm chất, vẫn nhiều gấp 20 lần khi làm Cách Mạng Tháng Tám, nếu có đường lối đúng đắn, vẫn hoàn toàn có thể lãnh đạo thành công xây dựng nước Việt Nam hòa bình, độc lập, thống nhất dân chủ và giầu mạnh… Phải học Bác như thế từ trong lý tưởng, trong thực tiễn…

Trong nhiều buổi họp khác nhau, Anh Sáu còn nhắc đi nhắc lại: Tinh thần “Không có gì quý hơn độc lập tự do!”, tinh thần “độc lập tự chủ và sáng tạo” thì phải học Bác suốt đời!.. Anh nhấn mạnh: Cứ khi nào không thấm nhuần hai điều cốt yếu này, là cách mạng y như gặp khó khăn, là y như phát sinh nhiều vấn đề…

Có thể nói qua những buổi trao đổi như thế, hầu như bao giờ cũng sôi nổi, chúng tôi chẳng những hiểu thêm Anh Sáu học tập Bác Hồ như thế nào, mà còn hiểu rõ được cái chất “Sáu Dân” của người đảng viên Võ Văn Kiệt, nhất là trong tình hình ngày nay cái tính đảng chân chính trong con người đảng viên, trong bản chất và đường lối chính sách của Đảng hình như rất ít được nói tới, được coi trọng mỗi khi bàn về Đảng, về xây dựng Đảng.

Cố Thủ tướng Võ Văn Kiệt thực là người hiểu sâu sắc Bác Hồ, nêu một tấm gương sáng về học tập tư tưởng và đạo đức Chủ tịch Hồ Chí Minh, xứng đáng là học trò xuất sắc của Người.

Hà Nội, 19-05-2010

—–

[1] Những câu chuyện này diễn ra vào lúc Anh Sáu và chúng tôi có nhiều cuộc thảo luận đánh giá lại lịch sử từ Cách mạng Tháng Tám, với mục đích tìm hiểu những vấn đề liên quan đến đổi mới Đảng cho phù hợp với đòi hỏi của giai đoạn cách mạng hiện tại. Trong những cuộc thảo luận như thế, chúng tôi đụng chạm tới nhiều sự kiện phức tạp: Cách ứng xử với các đảng phái và các nhân vật chính trị khác chính kiến và đối lập, đối phó với những lực lượng chống phá Cách mạng Tháng Tám và Tầu Tưởng, việc Bác chủ động đề nghị Việt Nam đứng trong khối Liên hiệp Pháp trong quá trình thương lượng không thành với Pháp, việc Bác quyết định nhất thời giải tán Đảng để tránh né những đòn chí mạng đánh vào nhà nước Việt Nam Dân Chủ Cộng Hòa thời trứng nước, việc Bác chủ động cho tiến hành chủ trương tìm cách thiết lập quan hệ ngoại giao với Mỹ, các hòa hoãn chính trị nhằm tranh thủ thời gian tối thiểu chuẩn bị cho toàn quốc kháng chiến chống Pháp, việc Bác phát động toàn quốc kháng chiến chống Mỹ xâm lược trong bối cảnh phe xã hội chủ nghĩa rạn nứt và chia rẽ ngày càng sâu sắc… Vân vân…

Đại gia Hoàng Kiều thâu tóm đất công tại Tiền Giang như thế nào?

Filed under: Uncategorized — ktetaichinh @ 3:45 am
Tags:

Ông Hoàng Kiều làm gì trên cù lao Thới Sơn? (LĐ 26-5-10)

Rùng mình “chiêm ngưỡng” công nghệ sản xuất giấy ăn

Filed under: Uncategorized — ktetaichinh @ 3:36 am
Tags:

VTC News) – Nếu không tận mắt chứng kiến, hẳn ít người tiêu dùng có thể ngờ rằng, đằng sau nhiều loại giấy ăn, giấy vệ sinh trắng bóc, nức mùi thơm đang bán trên thị trường lại là cả một công nghệ sản xuất thiếu vệ sinh đến mức rùng mình.

» Rùng mình “mục sở thị” chế biến lạp xưởng Tết
» Kinh hoàng “công nghệ” rượu chế biến từ nước lã pha cồn
» Video – Hãi hùng với “công nghệ” mỡ pha ruồi bọ
» Rùng mình “công nghệ” hãm tiết
» Video: Rùng mình với lò mổ và “công nghệ”… chọc tiết lợn
» Kinh hoàng “công nghệ” chế sữa đậu nành đường phố
» Sản xuất đá cây bằng “công nghệ”… bẩn

Những gì “tai nghe mắt thấy” khi chứng kiến công nghệ chế biến giấy ăn, giấy vệ sinh tại các cơ sở sản xuất giấy tại xã Phong Khê (Yên Phong, Bắc Ninh) sẽ khiến không ít người tiêu dùng phải rùng mình, sởn gai ốc.

Nồng nặc xưởng làm giấy

Một ngày tháng 4/2010, chúng tôi về xã Phong Khê (Yên Phong, Bắc Ninh), nơi sản xuất ra đủ các chủng loại giấy từ giấy thùng carton, giấy in, giấy báo, cho tới giấy ăn, giấy vệ sinh, và không khỏi kinh ngạc khi khắp các ngả đường tại xã này luôn nồng nặc mùi tạp chất được thải ra từ những xưởng sản xuất giấy.

Nguyên liệu sản xuất giấy vệ sinh “thật dai và mềm mại” chất như… bãi rác thải.

Không ngoa khi nhiều người cho rằng nơi đây là một “bãi rác” giấy khổng lồ. Người dân thu mua giấy phế liệu từ khắp các tỉnh, thêm vào đó do điều kiện nhà xưởng thấp kém, chật hẹp nên giấy phế liệu được các chủ sản xuất đắp thành đống từ đầu ngõ vào tận đến vách nhà xưởng.

Theo ông Nguyễn Văn Thụ, cán bộ địa chính – xây dựng xã Phong Khê, toàn xã Phong Khê từ xí nghiệp tư nhân cho tới doanh nghiệp, hợp tác xã cổ phần, công ty… có tất cả khoảng 200 đơn vị sản xuất giấy. Trong đó có 50% đơn vị sản xuất giấy ăn, giấy vệ sinh, mỗi xí nghiệp đạt công suất trung bình từ 1 – 2 tấn/ngày. 100% các đơn vị này có giấy phép kinh doanh nhưng tùy theo cấp độ, quy mô sản xuất để phân loại. Phần lớn các xí nghiệp sản xuất giấy tập trung thành khu công nghiệp, chính thức hoạt động năm 2003. Một số hộ gia đình khác kinh doanh tự phát, nhỏ lẻ.

Đi qua những con đường lầy lội, nước tù đọng đen ngòm, chúng tôi tới cơ sở sản xuất giấy của gia đình chị L thuộc khu công nghiệp xã Phong Khê, huyện Yên Phong, tỉnh Bắc Ninh.

Chỉ vài phút nữa thôi, đống giấy lộn lấm lem đất cát này sẽ được đưa vào tái chế.

Trong căn nhà chật chội, ẩm thấp, giấy được bày la liệt, chất đống cao chất ngất. Chúng tôi được “nếm” ngửi thứ mùi chua nồng khó chịu, ầm ì tiếng máy xeo (máy ép giấy), hơi nước bốc mù mịt.

Cảm giác đầu tiên khi bước vào bất kỳ một xí nghiệp sản xuất giấy nào trong khu công nghiệp Phong Khê là sự ngột ngạt, tù túng bởi khói quện lẫn với bụi, mù mịt bao quanh. Tiếp đó là cảm giác về sự ngổn ngang, giấy được vất bừa bãi khắp mọi nơi, mọi chỗ, mọi ngóc ngách, chồng đống từ cao xuống thấp. Giấy thành phẩm đóng gói chỉn chu, xếp hàng thẳng thớm nằm… sát cạnh đống giấy lộn bẩn thỉu. Khoảng cách giữa chúng chỉ là “công nghệ” chế biến giấy được làm theo một dây chuyền giản đơn và tiềm ẩn sự ô nhiễm nghiêm trọng.

Khâu đầu tiên, cũng là khâu quyết định tới chất lượng của sản phẩm là đưa giấy vào máy để xay nghiền. Tuy nhiên, công đoạn này được làm một cách tạm bợ.

Đây là công đoạn giấy bẩn được đưa vào ngâm và nghiền nát.

Nguyên liệu giấy không được chắt lọc cẩn thận mà tạp nham các loại giấy phế thải khác nhau, từ những cuộn giấy vệ sinh bỏ đi, “đầu thừa đuôi cụt” của các xí nghiệp giấy, tới các loại giấy vụn, giấy in, sách báo lem nhem được thu mua từ nhiều nguồn khác nhau.

Nhiều người khi chứng kiến tận mắt đống giấy thải này không khỏi băn khoăn tự hỏi: Liệu có khi nào, nguyên liệu giấy ở đây không ít loại được gom nhặt từ các bãi rác thải?

Tất cả các loại giấy bẩn được nghiền nhuyễn, hòa trộn vào nhau tạo nên một “hợp chất” nhầy nhụa sủi bọt, đen ngòm.

Tại đây, người công nhân chân đất, nồng nặc mùi mồ hôi vẫn giẫm đạp lên đống giấy nhàu nát, luôn tay ôm những chồng giấy bẩn cho vào bể ngâm kiềm. Những bể ngâm giấy mủn rò rỉ thứ nước thải nhớp nháp nền đất. Chiếc máy với khoanh sắt rỉ đóng cục nổi lên từng mảng. Khí Cl2 từ công đoạn tẩy Javen tỏa ra gây mùi khó chịu. Mỗi xưởng như một con quái vật khổng lồ.

Nước thải tù đọng, rác… lềnh phềnh

Chủ cơ sở L cho biết, xí nghiệp của chị đã kinh doanh sản xuất có thâm niên 5 năm, đội ngũ nhân viên có khoảng 10 người làm những công việc chuyên dụng khác nhau, người chuyên đứng nhặt giấy cho vào nghiền, người đứng ở cuối máy chuyên công tác cuộn giấy vào lô, người cắt giấy cùng một vài nhân viên đóng bao bì.

Máy móc rỉ “tiết” ra chất dịch có màu đỏ đặc quánh.

Mỗi ngày, cơ sở sản xuất giấy của gia đình chị L đưa ra ngoài thị trường trên 1 tấn giấy vệ sinh. Chị L cho biết, sản phẩm giấy vệ sinh sau khi chế biến sẽ được phân phối rộng rãi tại các quán ăn, khu công nghiệp, đặc biệt là hệ thống đại lý rộng rãi trên địa bàn Hà Nội.

Tại Phong Khê, một số lượng lớn hộ gia công nhỏ lẻ sản xuất giấy ăn cung cấp đi khắp các tỉnh thành trong cả nước, bán rộng rãi trên thị trường. Từ giấy ăn “thường dân” nhất như “giấy phở” (loại giấy ăn thô ráp, màu trắng đục, hình vuông vẫn thường dùng tại các quán cóc ven đường, quán cơm vỉa hè,…) đến các loại giấy ăn cao cấp đều được “chế biến” bằng công nghệ… nồng nặc như trên.

Anh Nguyễn Quốc An, sinh viên năm thứ 2, trường ĐH Bách Khoa trần tình: “Vẫn biết các giấy ăn tại các nhà ăn tập thể, nhà ăn sinh viên cũng như nhà hàng công cộng không được sạch sẽ, thậm chí chùi miệng lại thấy bẩn và ghê tởm hơn, nhưng đôi khi nó là thói quen, cứ thấy giấy ăn trên bàn thì cầm lấy và đưa lên miệng lau. Chẳng nhẽ ăn xong lại đứng đên, không lau miệng?!”.

Nhiều người sau khi sử dụng giấy ăn còn bực tức vì lau xong thì thấy giấy mủn ra, nhoen nhoét khắp quanh miệng.

Qua công đoạn tái chế sơ sài, nhiều loại giấy ăn được hình thành và dù không đảm bảo chất lượng vẫn được sử dụng như bình thường.


Cơ sở giấy Đoàn Chín là một trong những cơ sở sản xuất phôi (lõi giấy to – pv) giấy ăn cao cấp. Từ phôi giấy ăn này, nhiều đơn vị khác lấy về cắt ra thành từng mảnh theo kích thước phù hợp với nhu cầu. Đoàn Chín áp dụng công nghệ sản xuất hiện đại, lắng lọc sơ bộ và tuần hoàn nước thải an toàn môi trường, tuy nhiên nước từ các bể ngầm vẫn tràn ra nền, đọng từng vũng, bốc mùi chua loét. Con mương phía mé sau nhà anh Đoàn Chín nước đặc kịt, rác thải nổi… lềnh phềnh.

Những tấm bạt che bốc mùi tanh nồng ở cơ sở chế biến giấy ăn Đoàn Chín.
Nước thải tù đọng bốc mùi hôi thối ngay sau nhà xí nghiệp sản xuất giấy Đoàn Chín

Do đặc thù không thống nhất giữa khu công nghiệp tập trung và các xí nghiệp sản xuất giấy tự phát nên xã Phong Khê khó quản lý về việc đảm bảo vệ sinh, môi trường. Ông Nguyễn Văn Thụ thừa nhận: Hiện tại, cả xã Phong Khê vẫn chưa có hệ thống xử lý rác thải tập trung.

Đối với xí nghiệp kinh doanh tự phát, Ủy ban xã yêu cầu tập kết chất thải rắn và nước thải về chung một mối. Đối với khu công nghiệp, xã đã thành lập một đội quản lý gồm 11 người làm công tác đi thu dọn rác thải rắn ven đường, tiêu thông rãnh nước ứ đọng, huy động  xe chở rác về khu tập trung. Tuy nhiên, việc đôn đốc người dân thực hiện quy định cũng như việc quản lý, xử phạt vẫn chưa đạt được hiệu quả như mong muốn. Các bãi giấy rác vẫn chềnh ềnh bên vệ đường gây mất vệ sinh và phản cảm cho người đi lại, cản trở giao thông thôn xóm.

Các bãi giấy rác vẫn chềnh ềnh bên vệ đường gây mất vệ sinh, phản cảm và cản trở giao thông thôn xóm.

Phần lớn các xưởng giấy trong xã Phong Khê đều không đảm bảo vệ sinh an toàn lao động nên trong quá trình sản xuất đã gây ra một lượng khói bụi khổng lồ, vượt quá tiêu chuẩn cho phép ảnh hưởng trực tiếp đến sức khoẻ của người dân địa phương.

Ngoài ra, trong công nghiệ xeo giấy, để tạo nên một sản phẩm đặc thù hoặc những tính năng đặc thù cho sản phẩm, người ta còn sử dụng nhiều hóa chất và chất xúc tác. Khi chúng tôi hỏi các chủ xí nghiệp thì các nhà sản xuất đều chối rằng cơ sở mình không dùng chất tẩy trắng.

Với câu hỏi “cơ sở sản xuất của chị có sử dụng chất tẩy trắng không”, chị L đã vội vã xua tay, trả lời thẳng thừng “không có”. Thế nhưng, vừa ra tới ngoài sân, tôi có hỏi một nhân viên đang làm việc, anh thật thà nói: “Chắc chắn là phải có rồi. Em nhìn xem, giấy nhập vào thì ô hợp thế kia, còn giấy thành phẩm thì trắng tinh thế này”. Anh nhân viên này tiết lộ, các chất tẩy trắng được cho ngay vào công đoạn đầu tiên để ngâm giấy.

Tại Hà Nội, làng Trích Sài (phường Bưởi, Tây Hồ) là một trong những nơi chuyên cung cấp “giấy phở” nổi tiếng. Làng có hơn 100 hộ dân làm nghề tái chế giấy ăn, xuất 3 – 10 tấn/tháng đổ ra cho các nhà hàng, quán ăn. Xeo giấy nhập về để lăn lóc dưới nền nhà ẩm ướt, giấy ăn thành phẩm cũng chỉ được cho vào bao tải khi có khách gọi, chưa kể, xấp giấy thành phẩm có màu trắng đục, khi lắc, vô số hạt bụi bay ra.

Các chuyên gia về y tế nhấn mạnh rằng: Bụi giấy ở các loại giấy ăn chất lượng kém sẽ xâm nhập vào cơ thể qua đường hô hấp. Hóa chất chống ẩm và màu công nghiệp khi tiếp xúc với da có thể gây dị ứng khi kết hợp với sự bài tiết của mồ hôi. Nguy hiểm hơn, khi dùng giấy lau miệng, những hóa chất này sẽ xâm nhập vào cơ thể, về lâu dài có thể gây ung thư.

Ngoài ra, các hộ làm giấy ăn thủ công ở làng Trích Sài cho biết: Để tẩy trắng một tấn giấy phế liệu cần 9kg sút và 30 – 40l javen. Hai loại hóa chất này đòi hỏi quy trình sản xuất nghiêm ngặt. Theo tiêu chuẩn quốc tế, nồng độ cho phép trong nước của xút và javen là dưới 0,3mg/l.

Theo các chuyên gia về hóa học: Nếu xử lý đúng quy trình, lượng xút và javen trong giấy ăn thành phẩm hầu như không ảnh hưởng đến sức khỏe người tiêu dùng. Tuy nhiên, nếu vượt quá mức cho phép, lượng hoá chất tồn dư có thể gây kích ứng da và trở thành “ổ” bệnh về đường tiêu hóa như tiêu chảy, rộp môi… đối với người mẫn cảm”.

» Rùng mình “mục sở thị” chế biến lạp xưởng Tết
» Kinh hoàng “công nghệ” rượu chế biến từ nước lã pha cồn
» Video – Hãi hùng với “công nghệ” mỡ pha ruồi bọ
» Rùng mình “công nghệ” hãm tiết
» Video: Rùng mình với lò mổ và “công nghệ”… chọc tiết lợn
» Kinh hoàng “công nghệ” chế sữa đậu nành đường phố
» Sản xuất đá cây bằng “công nghệ”… bẩn

Bàn thêm về khoảng cách giàu nghèo ở Việt Nam

Filed under: Uncategorized — ktetaichinh @ 3:34 am
Tags:

Khoảng cách giàu – nghèo không phải chỉ là một chỉ tiêu kinh tế. Nó còn phản ánh sự gắn kết xã hội và là một thể hiện của sự bình đẳng trong xã hội. Khoảng cách giàu – nghèo ắt sẽ nảy sinh. Nhưng sự bền vững của phát triển ở tất cả các nước, và hơn thế nữa định hướng xã hội chủ nghĩa, không chấp nhận khoảng cách giàu – nghèo đi vào phân cực quá một ngưỡng cho phép.

Báo cáo bổ sung tình hình kinh tế – xã hội năm 2009 và triển khai thực hiện kế hoạch phát triển kinh tế – xã hội năm 2010 của Chính phủ, cũng như báo cáo thẩm tra đánh giá bổ sung của Ủy ban Kinh tế tại kỳ họp thứ 7 của Quốc hội đề cập đến vấn đề giảm nghèo nhưng không có một thông tin nào về khoảng cách giàu nghèo trong xã hội. Xin có vài số liệu bổ sung vào bức tranh kinh tế – xã hội của đất nước [1].

Khoảng cách giàu nghèo trong xã hội được thể hiện bằng nhiều cách, thông qua thu nhập, qua các chi tiêu, qua việc hưởng thụ các tiện ích y tế, giáo dục, văn hóa. Đối với các quốc gia, các vùng và các tỉnh thành phố, qua chỉ số phát triển con người (HDI) hoặc thông qua chỉ số phát triển thiên niên kỷ (MDG). Số liệu mà bài viết này dẫn ra chủ yếu là về khoảng cách qua thu nhập.

(1) Theo số liệu thống kê, hệ số chênh lệch thu nhập bình quân đầu người của nhóm 20% cao nhất so với nhóm 20% thấp nhất trong cả nước năm 1990 là 4,1 lần, năm 1991 là 4,2 lần, năm 1993 là 6,2 lần, năm 1994 là 6,5 lần, năm 1995 là 7,0 lần, năm 1996 là 7,3 lần, năm 1999 là 7,6 lần, năm 2002 là 8,1 lần và năm 2004 là 8,4 lần. Trong 14 năm, hệ số chênh lệch tăng lên 2,05 lần.

(2) Một chỉ số khác về khoảng cách giàu nghèo trong xã hội là tỷ trọng tổng thu nhập của 40% số hộ có thu nhập thấp nhất (nhóm 1 và nhóm 2) trong tổng thu nhập (của cả 5 nhóm). Theo quy ước mà Bộ Tài chính sử dụng, nếu tỷ trọng này nhỏ hơn hay bằng 12% thì bất bình đẳng là cao; nằm trong khoảng 12 – 17%, bất bình đẳng vừa; nếu lớn hơn hay bằng 17% là tương đối bình đẳng.

Khoảng cách giàu – nghèo không phải chỉ là một chỉ tiêu kinh tế. Nó còn phản ánh sự gắn kết xã hội và là một thể hiện của sự bình đẳng trong xã hội. Ảnh minh họa: Saga

Số liệu thống kê cho kết quả: tỷ trọng này của Việt Nam năm 1995 là 21,1%; năm 1996 là 21%; năm 1999 là 18,7%; năm 2002 là 18%, năm 2004 là 17,4%. Trong 9 năm, sự chênh lệch về thu nhập giữa các nhóm hộ từ tương đối bình đẳng đang tiến dần về bất bình đẳng vừa.

(3) Hệ số Gini (G) là một chỉ số khác nữa thể hiện sự bình đẳng hay bất bình đẳng trong xã hội. Hệ số G có trị số nằm trong khoảng từ 0 đến 1. G = 0 là trường hợp bình đẳng hoàn hảo, trong khi đó G = 1 là bất bình đẳng hoàn hảo.

Các số liệu thống kê Việt Nam cho thấy, hệ số Gini năm 1994 là 0,350, năm 1995 là 0,357, năm 1996 là 0,362, năm 1999 là 0,390, năm 2002 là 0,420, năm 2004 là 0,423. Sự bình đẳng đang giảm dần, sự bất bình đẳng đang lớn dần.

(4) Hệ số chênh lệch thu nhập giữa các nhóm hộ có thu nhập cao nhất và thấp nhất trong cả nước và tại một số vùng, theo kết quả điều tra của TCTK, trong các năm 1996 và 1999 như sau:

Trong mười năm trở lại đây, không tìm thấy số liệu điều tra.

Các số liệu, tính toán theo các phương pháp khác nhau, tự chúng đã nói lên khá rõ về khoảng cách giàu nghèo trong xã hội và động thái của nó trong thời gian qua ở nước ta. Rất tiếc không tìm được số liệu sau năm 2004 và nhất là những năm gần đây.

Khoảng cách giàu – nghèo không phải chỉ là một chỉ tiêu kinh tế. Nó còn phản ánh sự gắn kết xã hội và là một thể hiện của sự bình đẳng trong xã hội. Nói cách khác, nó là một chỉ số vừa của môi trường kinh tế vừa của môi trường xã hội.

Xã hội cần có đông lực để phát triển. Khoảng cách giàu – nghèo ắt sẽ nảy sinh. Nhưng sự bền vững của phát triển ở tất cả các nước, và hơn thế nữa định hướng xã hội chủ nghĩa, không chấp nhận khoảng cách giàu – nghèo đi vào phân cực quá một ngưỡng cho phép.

Để cử tri cả nước có điều kiện theo dõi khía cạnh này, Quốc hội và Chính phủ nên bổ sung báo cáo của mình tại kỳ họp này [2], và trong hệ thống các chỉ tiêu kinh tế xã hội hàng năm từ nay về sau, một chỉ tiêu về khoảng cách giàu nghèo trong xã hội nước ta.


[1] Số liệu trong bài viết được tập hợp từ số liệu thống kê chính thức và một số tài liệu đã được công bố, đọc được qua mạng: (a) Số liệu của Tổng Cục Thống Kê, đặc biệt hai tài liệu Phân tích kết quả điều tra đời sống, kinh tế hộ gia đình năm 1999Điều tra mức sống hộ gia đình 2006.  (b) Thực trạng giàu nghèo và những vấn đề đặt ra, 03.2006, TBTC 34 của Bộ Tài Chính. http://www.mof.gov.vn/Default.aspx?tabid=612&ItemID=31712.

[2] Có thể tại các phiên thảo luận và chất vấn tại kỳ họp.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.